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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Great Britain and Ireland / British Measurements & Cooking Terms
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    British Measurements & Cooking Terms

    Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next Page >>
    Sackville
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 4:16 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I know that one of the most difficult things in deciphering American vs British recipes can be the measurements. I hope the following conversions will be helpful to you. If you cook a lot of British recipes, a scale will be an invaluable tool to add to your kitchen.

    Temperature

    100 C = 212 F
    110 C = 225 F
    130 C = 250 F = Gas 1/2
    140 C = 275 F = Gas 1
    150 C = 300 F = Gas 2
    170 C = 325 F = Gas 3
    180 C = 350 F = Gas 4
    190 C = 375 F = Gas 5
    200 C = 400 F = Gas 6
    220 C = 425 F = Gas 7
    230 C = 450 F = Gas 8
    240 C = 475 F = Gas 9

    Weights

    10g = 1/2 oz
    20g = 3/4 oz
    25g = 1 oz
    50g = 2 oz
    100g = 3 oz
    150g = 5 oz
    250g = 6 oz
    300g = 10 oz
    400g = 14 oz
    450g = 1 lb
    500g = 1lb 2 oz

    Butter, Shortening, Cheese and Other Fats

    1 tbsp = 1/8 stick = 1/2 oz = 15g
    2 tbsp = 1/4 stick = 1 oz = 30g
    4 tbsp = 1/2 stick = 2 oz = 60g = 1/4 cup
    8 tbsp = 1 stick = 4 oz = 115g = 1/2 cup
    16 tbsp = 2 sticks = 8 oz = 225g = 1 cup
    32 tbsp = 4 sticks = 16 oz = 45og = 2 cups

    Flour (unsifted)

    1 tbsp = 1/4 oz = 8.75g
    4 tbsp = 1 1/4 oz = 35g = 1/4 cup
    5 tbsp = 1 1/2 oz = 45g = 1/3 cup
    = 2 1/2 oz = 70g = 2/3 cup
    = 3 1/2 oz = 90g = 3/4 cup
    = 5 oz = 140g = 1 cup

    Granulated Sugar

    1 tsp = 1/6 oz = 5 g
    1 tbsp = 1/2 oz = 15g
    4 tbsp = 1 3/4 oz = 45g = 1/4 cup
    5 tbsp = 2 1/4 oz = 75g = 1/3 cup
    = 3 1/2 oz = 100g = 1/2 cup
    = 7 oz = 200g = 1 cup

    Other Equivalents

    Breadcrumbs

    Dry: 3/4 cup = 4 oz = 115g
    Fresh: 2 cups = 4 oz = 115g

    Brown Sugar: 1 1/2 cups = 1 lb = 450g

    Confectioners' or Icing Sugar: 4 cups = 1 lb = 450g

    Egg Whites: 1 = 2 tbsp and 8 = 1 cup

    Egg Yolks: 1 = 1 tbsp and 16 = 1 cup

    Nuts

    Chopped: 3/4 cup = 4 oz = 115g
    Ground: 1 cup loosely packed = 4 oz = 115g

    Vegetables:

    Sliced Carrots and other roots: 3 cups = 1 lb = 450g
    Puréed Carrots and other roots: 1 1/3 cups = 1 lb = 450g
    Onions, sliced: 1 1/3 cups = 1 lb = 450g
    Potatoes, raw, sliced or chopped: 3 cups = 1 lb = 450g
    Spinach: 1 1/2 cups = 1 lb = 45og

    Ounces to grams: multiply by 28.35
    Teaspoons to milliliters: multiply by 5
    Tablespoons to milliliters: multiply by 15
    Fluid ounces to millilitres: multiply by 0.24
    Cups to litres: multiply by 0.24
    Fahrenheit to Celsius: subtract 32, multiply by 5 and divide by 9

    COOKING TERMS

    I hope this will be a fairly comprehensive list of British cooking terms and their equivalents. If you find any I've missed, let me know and I'll add them to the list icon_biggrin.gif

    I also recommend www.foodsubs.com as an excellent resource when it comes to finding substitutes.

    British terms are on the left and American terms on the right.

    A

    aubergine = eggplant
    ale = a beer stronger than most lagers sold in the U.S.

    B

    bap = a bun, similar to what you'd use for a hamburger but bigger and also used for sandwiches
    bangers = sausage (when used in bangers & mash you want a nice, thick, meaty one)
    beetroot = beet
    bicarbonate of soda = baking soda
    biscuit = cracker or cookie
    braising steak = chuck steak
    broad bean = fava bean
    bully beef = corned beef

    C

    candy floss = cotton candy
    caster sugar = superfine granulated (to make your own, whizz regular granulated in a blender for a minute)
    chicory = endive
    chipolata = small pork sausage
    chips = french fries
    cling film = plastic wrap
    collops = meatballs
    coriander leaves = cilantro
    corn flour = corn starch
    cos = romaine lettuce
    courgette = a small zucchini (nothing like the size of zucchinis that are often grown in U.S. gardens)
    crisps = potato chips

    D

    demerara = sugar light brown cane sugar
    desiccated coconut = shredded coconut
    devonshire dream = a particular type of clotted cream
    digestive biscuits = similar to graham crackers
    double cream = heavy cream

    E

    endive = chicory
    essence = extract

    F

    fairy cake = cupcake
    finnan haddie = smoked haddock
    french bean = green bean

    G

    gammon = ham (a cooked joint that is eaten hot, often with pineapple)
    glacé = candied
    golden syrup = similar to light corn syrup
    greaseproof paper = wax paper
    grill = broil
    griller = broiler

    H

    ham = bought cold and thinly sliced
    hob = stovetop
    hundreds and thousands = sprinkles

    I

    icing sugar = confectioners' sugar

    J

    jacket potato = baked potato
    jelly = jello

    K

    king prawns = jumbo shrimp

    M

    mangetout = snow peas
    marmite = a brand name for a yeast extract that Brits love to spread on their toast. You will either love it or hate it. Marmite can also be a flavouring on things like Twiglets, a type of snack food.
    marrow = squash that looks like a giant zucchini
    mince = ground meat

    N

    neeps = mashed turnips (the yellow kind, rutebega)

    O

    offal = variety meats (liver, heart, kidney)

    P

    pine kernels = pine nuts
    pips = seeds
    prawns = a large shrimp
    pudding = dessert
    pudding rice = used specifically for desserts like rice pudding, short-grained, arborio may make an acceptable substitute
    punnet = basket, as in strawberries or blueberries, usually a pint in America

    R

    rasher = slice (most often used in terms of bacon)
    rocket = argula

    S

    self raising flour = all-purpose flour with baking powder
    shandy = beer with lemonade
    sharon fruit = persimmon
    sherbet = powdered candy
    silverside = beef cut from the rump
    silver beet = swiss chard
    single cream = light cream
    spring onion = scallion/green onion
    squash = liquid concentrate, which makes a fruity drink when diluted (kind of like koolaid)
    stoned = seeded
    strong flour = bread flour or hard-wheat flour
    sultanas = golden raisins
    swede = yellow turnip (rutebega)
    swiss roll tin = jelly roll pan

    T

    tatties = potatoes
    treacle = similar to molasses

    W

    wholemeal flour = wholewheat flour



    Sylvie here to edit:

    Sackville made this wonderful list of different British cookbooks owned by some of us, which I didn't want to get lost when the topic got 'un-stickied', so I thought I'd paste it in here for safekeeping..........icon_biggrin.gif


    This is a list of books on British cookery owned by Zaar members. We'll never get time to post all the recipes in them, but if you think a recipe you'd like might be found in one of these, then please let us know.

    Likewise, if you have some books and wouldn't mind being a resource for others on Zaar, please get in contact with me and I'll list your books here.

    It's divided into categories, with general British cookery at the top, followed by books on specific regions and finally those which may not focus on British cooking but are written by British chefs at the bottom.

    GENERAL BRITISH COOKBOOKS

    icon_arrow.gif Simply British by Sybil Kapoor -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif British Cooking from the Time Life collection -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif Royal Cookery Book by Mrs McKee (a book written by a former cook to The Queen and The Queen Mother) -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif Century of British Cooking by Marguerite Patten -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif British Recipes, The Traditional Dishes of England, Scotland, Ireland & Wales compiled and edited by Countess Morphy (1936) -- owned by Kookaburra
    icon_arrow.gif The World Encyclopedia of Bread by Christine Ingram and Jennie Shapter -- owned by Kookaburra
    icon_arrow.gif McDougall's Cookbook (flour) -- owned by Hels
    icon_arrow.gif The Dairy Book of Home Cookery 1977 -- owned by Hels
    icon_arrow.gif The Pooh Cookbook by Katie Stewart -- owned by Hels
    icon_arrow.gif The Usborne First Cookbook -- owned by Hels
    icon_arrow.gif Nanny Ogg's Cookbook by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Briggs -- owned by Hels
    icon_arrow.gif Early Settlers' Household Lore, compiled by Mrs. N. Pescott (from Sovereign Hill Historical Village, Ballarat) - recipes from the Victorian (Australian) goldfields of the 1850s (mostly British recipes) -- owned by Kookaburra
    icon_arrow.gif Simple Ways to Success - British; by Mark Hix -- owned by Sylvie77
    icon_arrow.gif Farmhouse Kitchen II -- owned by Sylvie77

    ENGLISH COOKBOOKS

    icon_arrow.gif English Food by Jane Grigson -- owned by Sackville Girl and Sherrie-Pie
    icon_arrow.gif Devonshire Flavour compiled by Elizabeth Lothian -- owned by Kookaburra

    IRISH COOKBOOKS

    icon_arrow.gif Traditional Cooking by Darina Allen -- owned by Sackville Girl

    SCOTTISH COOKBOOKS

    icon_arrow.gif Scottish Regional Recipes by Catherine Brown -- owned by Sackville Girl

    BRITISH CHEFS

    Lindsay Bareham

    icon_arrow.gif A Celebration of Soup by Lindsay Bareham -- owned by Sherrie-Pie
    icon_arrow.gif Roast Chicken and other stories by Lindsay Bareham and Simon Hopkinson -- owned by Sherrie-Pie and Marie Alice

    Mary Berry

    icon_arrow.gif Mary Berry's Complete Cookbook -- owned by Hels
    icon_arrow.gif Mary Berry's Ultimate Cake Book -- owned by Marie Alice

    Frances Bissell

    icon_arrow.gif The Organic Meat Cookbook by Frances Bissell -- owned by

    Elizabeth David

    icon_arrow.gif French Country Cooking by Elizabeth David -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif Summer Cooking by Elizabeth David -- -- owned by Sackville Girl and Sherrie-Pie


    Rose Elliott

    icon_arrow.gif Vegetarian Cookery by Rose Elliot -- owned by

    Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

    icon_arrow.gif The River Cottage Meat Book by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif The River Cottage Cookbook; by Hugh Fernley-Whittingstall -- owned by Sylvie77

    Rose Gray

    icon_arrow.gif River Cafe Cookbook Green by Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif River Cafe Cook Book Two, by Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers -- owned by Lennie

    Jane Grigson

    icon_arrow.gif Good Things by Jane Grigson -- owned by Anisel
    icon_arrow.gif The Mushroom Feast by Jane Grigson -- owned by Anisel
    icon_arrow.gif The Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson -- owned by Anisel
    icon_arrow.gif Fish Cookery by Jane Grigson -- owned by Anisel

    Sophie Grigson

    icon_arrow.gif Sophie Grigson: Sophie Grigson's Country Kitchen -- owned by Marie Alice

    Alastair Hendy

    icon_arrow.gif Cooking for Friends by Alastair Hendy -- owned by Kookaburra

    Madhur Jaffrey

    icon_arrow.gif Ultimate Curry Bible by Madhur Jaffrey -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif Flavours of India by Madhur Jaffrey -- owned by Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif Indian Cookery by Madhur Jaffrey -- owned by Marie Alice

    Nigella Lawson

    icon_arrow.gif Nigella Bites by Nigella Lawson -- owned by Sackville Girl and Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif How to Eat by Nigella Lawson -- owned by Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif How to be a Domestic Goddess by Nigella Lawson -- owned by Lennie and Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif Feast by Nigella Lawson -- owned by Marie Alice

    Kenneth Lo

    icon_arrow.gif The Wok Cookbook by Kenneth Lo -- owned by Hels

    Linda McCartney
    icon_arrow.gif Linda Mc Cartney on Tour - Vegetarian Recipes From Around the World -- owned by Sylvie77

    Nick Nairn
    icon_arrow.gif Nick Nairn: 100 Chicken Recipes -- owned by Marie Alice

    Jamie Oliver

    icon_arrow.gif Happy Days with the Naked Chef by Jamie Oliver -- owned by Kookaburra
    and Sackville Girl
    icon_arrow.gif The Return of the Naked Chef by Jamie Oliver -- owned by Sackville Girl

    Gordon Ramsay

    icon_arrow.gif Kitchen Heaven by Gordon Ramsay -- owned by Sackville Girl

    Gary Rhodes

    icon_arrow.gif Gary Rhodes: New British Classics, Spring Into Summer, Fall Into Winter -- owned by Marie Alice

    Delia Smith

    icon_arrow.gif Delia Smith's Complete Cookery Course, Classic Edition -- owned by Kookaburra
    icon_arrow.gif How to Cook, Book One by Delia Smith -- owned by Kookaburra and Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif How to Cook, Book Two by Delia Smith -- owned by Kookaburra and Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif How to Cook, Book Three by Delia Smith -- owned by Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif The Delia Collection (Books: Pork, Italian, Fish, Chocolate, Chicken and Soup) -- owned by Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif Delia Smith's Vegetarian Collection -- owned by Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif Delia Smith's Summer Collection -- owned by Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif Delia Smith's Winter Collection -- owned by Kookaburra and Marie Alice
    icon_arrow.gif Delia Smith's Christmas -- owned by Lennie and Marie Alice

    Nigel Slater

    icon_arrow.gif Real Fast Food by Nigel Slater -- owned by Marie Alice and Sherrie-Pie
    icon_arrow.gif Real Fast Puddings by Nigel Slater -- owned by Sherrie-Pie

    Rick Stein

    icon_arrow.gif English Seafood Cookery by Rick Stein -- owned by Sherrie-Pie

    Caroline Waldegrave

    icon_arrow.gif Leith's Easy Dinner Parties by Caroline Waldegrave, Puff Fairclough and Janey Orr -- owned by Sackville Girl


    Last edited by Sackville on Mon Aug 22, 2005 9:50 am, edited 14 times in total
    chia
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 4:36 pm
    Forum Host
    excellent, sg! we have golden syrup here in pa, but i've never hear of it/used it--
    so nice to have some ingredients clarified for us yanks icon_wink.gif
    Hey Jude
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 10:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    SG, thanks so much for the list....I have lots of British cookbooks and am always confused by some of the ingredients, terms, etc. This is going to help me a LOT!
    Sackville
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 1:29 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm glad it's helpful. As it grows longer, it may be hard to find things. Would you like me to break it up into sections alphabetically or perhaps by category (veggies/meat/fruit/etc...)? What would be most helpful, do you think?
    -Sylvie-
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:16 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I think sections are probably easier to 'navigate'!

    Thanks for all that work!
    Hey Jude
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 11:44 am
    Food.com Groupie
    One of the things I notice often in my British books is a measurement called a 'knob', usually applied to butter. Does anyone know how much butter a 'knob' is?
    -Sylvie-
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 11:54 am
    Food.com Groupie
    It's about 3/4 of a tablespoon I'd say. It usually doesn't matter that much if something calls for a 'knob' of butter whether you use a little more or less. it's sort of what you automatically cut off from a stick of butter for frying. Hope that helps!
    Hey Jude
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 2:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sylvie77 wrote:
    It's about 3/4 of a tablespoon I'd say. It usually doesn't matter that much if something calls for a 'knob' of butter whether you use a little more or less. it's sort of what you automatically cut off from a stick of butter for frying. Hope that helps!


    It does help...thanks Sylvie! I was using about 1-2 tablespoons of butter when the recipe called for a knob, so I'll cut that back a bit!
    Heather Sullivan
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 2:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sylvie77 wrote:
    It's about 3/4 of a tablespoon I'd say. It usually doesn't matter that much if something calls for a 'knob' of butter whether you use a little more or less. it's sort of what you automatically cut off from a stick of butter for frying. Hope that helps!

    If you're Gary Rhoads, a knob of butter seems to be closer to a lump the size of a walnut or more ... Although, if you were Gary Rhoads you'd have funny hair and be single-handledly supporting the butter industry icon_lol.gif
    -Sylvie-
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 3:02 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hey Jude wrote:
    Sylvie77 wrote:
    It's about 3/4 of a tablespoon I'd say. It usually doesn't matter that much if something calls for a 'knob' of butter whether you use a little more or less. it's sort of what you automatically cut off from a stick of butter for frying. Hope that helps!


    It does help...thanks Sylvie! I was using about 1-2 tablespoons of butter when the recipe called for a knob, so I'll cut that back a bit!


    A tablespoon is fine, as I said it's not an exact measurement. It's like saying a handful of something, it really depends on the cook! icon_smile.gif
    JustJanS
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 2:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Good list SG. I used it for inspiration to start one in Austrlaian/NZ forum. Maybe there are a few things in it you can use here too.
    Mirj
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 11:05 am
    Forum Host
    Found one you're missing:

    Sharon fruit -- persimmon
    punnet -- basket, as in strawberries or blueberries, usually a pint in America
    wizkid
    Sun Jan 30, 2005 3:13 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    This is interesting, however, there are one or two things that are not quite accurate.

    In England we have prawns and shrimps

    prawns are bigger and shrimps smaller
    who on earth uses the term collops or bully beef (I think it was called bully beef around the time of the 2nd world war, but no longer)

    We have gammon and ham. Gammon is the joint that you tend to eat hot, often with pineapple. Ham is the product you buy cold, and is very thinly sliced.
    Sackville
    Sun Jan 30, 2005 3:25 am
    Food.com Groupie
    wizkid wrote:
    This is interesting, however, there are one or two things that are not quite accurate.

    In England we have prawns and shrimps

    prawns are bigger and shrimps smaller
    who on earth uses the term collops or bully beef (I think it was called bully beef around the time of the 2nd world war, but no longer)

    We have gammon and ham. Gammon is the joint that you tend to eat hot, often with pineapple. Ham is the product you buy cold, and is very thinly sliced.


    Thank you for your help. As I'm not British by birth, I sometimes miss these things. I'll fix them in the list above.

    Hope you stick around as lots of opinions are always appreciated!
    wizkid
    Sun Jan 30, 2005 5:28 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Its a pleasure to help. I must admit, until I started using recipezaar I didn't know how different our two languages are!

    icon_smile.gif
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