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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Anyone ever can meat using a water bath?
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    Anyone ever can meat using a water bath?

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    Roger/OH
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:35 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Two years ago a friend gave me a recipe to can beaver meat ( four legged type) He uses this method for most wild game. I canned some beaver and some deer, but am a little leary. I have had his and it is great.
    The processing method he uses is to put the jats of meat in a water bath, bring the water to a boil, cover, boil for 3 hours, turn heat off, remove lid and let cool. I know the modern wisdom says use a pressure cooker, but I have heard of this method from several oldtimers. Works for him. Any thoughts?
    Dib's
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Roger/OH wrote:
    Two years ago a friend gave me a recipe to can beaver meat ( four legged type) He uses this method for most wild game. I canned some beaver and some deer, but am a little leary. I have had his and it is great.
    The processing method he uses is to put the jats of meat in a water bath, bring the water to a boil, cover, boil for 3 hours, turn heat off, remove lid and let cool. I know the modern wisdom says use a pressure cooker, but I have heard of this method from several oldtimers. Works for him. Any thoughts?


    NO, NO, and again NO.

    Did I mention NO? The reason. You run a SERIOUS risk of killing yourself or someone else with food poisioning. Not worth the risk.

    Di icon_wink.gif
    Jenny Sanders
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Yes, the trouble with those old methods is that they may work very well, 99.99% of the time. Thing is, though, do you really want to be the .01%? Especially given that it isn't any harder and only a little more expensive (invest in that pressure canner!) to do it right.
    bikerchick
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 1:10 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Roger/OH wrote:
    Two years ago a friend gave me a recipe to can beaver meat ( four legged type) He uses this method for most wild game. I canned some beaver and some deer, but am a little leary. I have had his and it is great.
    The processing method he uses is to put the jats of meat in a water bath, bring the water to a boil, cover, boil for 3 hours, turn heat off, remove lid and let cool. I know the modern wisdom says use a pressure cooker, but I have heard of this method from several oldtimers. Works for him. Any thoughts?


    I think someone (or more than one someone) on another forum was having trouble with their MIL? Maybe they'd like to try making the recipe and have their MIL sample it? rotfl.gif
    eek!
    Jellyqueen
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 2:03 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Roger/OH wrote:
    Two years ago a friend gave me a recipe to can beaver meat ( four legged type) He uses this method for most wild game. I canned some beaver and some deer, but am a little leary. I have had his and it is great.
    The processing method he uses is to put the jats of meat in a water bath, bring the water to a boil, cover, boil for 3 hours, turn heat off, remove lid and let cool. I know the modern wisdom says use a pressure cooker, but I have heard of this method from several oldtimers. Works for him. Any thoughts?


    I don't think I would want to try this. But then again, I am not much of a meat eater, so I wouldn't want to pressure can it either....I just think if I did do it, I would use a pressure canner.

    I know when we were growing up, no one sealed jellies. They put melted wax on the top and then just removed the wax and the top skim of the jelly when they opened the jars to use. I have done this myself, when I first started making jellies, but as I got older, I guess I got a little more cautious. I just can't see canning jellies that way any more.

    Now, was that rambling enough or what!!!!

    Sorry I know that this has not been much help.

    JQ icon_smile.gif
    Jenny Sanders
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 2:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    One other comment about this. I've noticed a few people posting in the Q & A thread over the past months who have canned meat using a boiling water bath, and then had all of the seals fail. So on top of the danger of unrecognizeable toxins (boltulism) you also run the risk of losing your food to recognizeable problems as well.
    UnknownChef86
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 5:15 pm
    Forum Host
    Roger,
    The reason behind a pressure cooker vs. a water bath for all low-acid foods (not just meat) is that there are some bacteria that are not killed at the temperature a boiling water bath reaches, no matter how many hours you boil it. Some bacteria are simply hardier than others. With the pressure cooker, you can reach temperatures that will kill those bacteria.

    While it sounds easier to just boil the jars like your friend does, it's truly not worth the potential cost when you consider you could be racking up medical (or worse!) bills by using methods that have been proven to be unsafe. I would highly advise you contact your local cooperative extension agency for more information. And while your friend's canned meat might be tasty...I'd highly advise not consuming any more of it.

    Hope some of this helped...
    UC86
    dna414
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 12:18 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Roger,
    We have canned venison for years using the water bath method and have never had any problems. Just my 2 cents worth.

    Dan
    Aroostook
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 4:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Roger,
    I can a lot of wild meat and I wouldn't think of using a water bath the way the old timers did. I have heard success stories of canning meat in a prolonged water bath but I have also heard the stories of people almost dying after contracting food poisoning from improperly canned goods. Hope this helps.... icon_razz.gif
    Barb
    PS...all I can think of is playing culinary Russian Roulette icon_confused.gif icon_wink.gif
    CarrolJ
    Sun Jan 30, 2005 5:02 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    One of my aunts (who is now unfortunately deceased) used to can her portion of the venison that her sons shot and processed. (one of her sons is extremely proficient at processing and removing all tallow) Anyway she once gave me 2 quarts of her homecanned product...it was the best tasting venison I have ever eaten. It had such a wonderful flavor it tasted like a very expensive cut of canned beef. I wish I had asked for her recipe before she died a couple of years ago.

    I'm sure she pressure canned it...as the family has always been especially careful how food was preserved and prepared.
    Derald Detrick
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 6:59 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    You may be safe most of the time, but water bath canning any food that does not have enough acid in it, leaves the possibility of the formation of botulisum poisoning. It would only take you being wrong once and the result is deadly.
    If you check canning books, all of the foods with a recipe for water bath canning, like tomatoes etc. are acid base foods that make that method of canning safe.
    Queen Dragon Mom
    Sat Feb 05, 2005 9:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Need to pressure can it. As Roo says "culinary Russian Roulette " My Grandma didn't water-bath her meats, she larded or dried or salted them.
    Dienia B.
    Tue Mar 08, 2005 11:19 am
    Food.com Groupie
    funny bikerchick hehehe
    Dienia B.
    Tue Mar 08, 2005 11:26 am
    Food.com Groupie
    beach girl #53234 has a recipe like my ex mil canned and it was pressure cooked and im posting her gravy using the canned venison that woman canned everything that that diidnt move and a few that where moving slow lol but she always used pressure 90 minutes 10lbs pressure she ccooked the meat off the bones for 90 minutes and them canned that meat for another 90 minutes in the jar she didnt even waste the oink on a pig
    Roger/OH
    Tue Mar 15, 2005 10:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    dienia bennett wrote:
    beach girl #53234 has a recipe like my ex mil canned and it was pressure cooked and im posting her gravy using the canned venison that woman canned everything that that diidnt move and a few that where moving slow lol but she always used pressure 90 minutes 10lbs pressure she ccooked the meat off the bones for 90 minutes and them canned that meat for another 90 minutes in the jar she didnt even waste the oink on a pig

    Thanks for the responds. I placed several of your canning recipes in my cookbok and look forward to the gravy recipe.
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