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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Hello Bread Lovers!
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    Hello Bread Lovers!

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    WaterMelon
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 3:53 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna M. wrote:

    Watermelon, when I answered your question before I think I was half asleep (it was after midnite here when I found the new forums were up and running).

    Actually, I don't know for sure if a fermented starter made from commercial yeast will retain its freshness as well as a wild yeast sourdough starter.

    I only use wild yeast starters. Years ago I used one that wasn't wild yeast and had okay results with it, but nothing spectacular. Once you switch to wild yeast, you'll never go back! (If you get a good one). Wild yeasts vary in flavor and rising characteristics according to the region from where they were captured. It is usually best to get a start from someone who already has a good culture going.


    I'm not always home to feed the starter... and I don't really bake everyday. Just something I love to do to relieve stress. icon_biggrin.gif Thanks so much for your patience in answering my questions, donna. icon_biggrin.gif
    CarrolJ
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 9:55 am
    Food.com Groupie
    WaterMelon wrote:
    Donna M. wrote:

    Watermelon, when I answered your question before I think I was half asleep (it was after midnite here when I found the new forums were up and running).

    Actually, I don't know for sure if a fermented starter made from commercial yeast will retain its freshness as well as a wild yeast sourdough starter.

    I only use wild yeast starters. Years ago I used one that wasn't wild yeast and had okay results with it, but nothing spectacular. Once you switch to wild yeast, you'll never go back! (If you get a good one). Wild yeasts vary in flavor and rising characteristics according to the region from where they were captured. It is usually best to get a start from someone who already has a good culture going.


    I'm not always home to feed the starter... and I don't really bake everyday. Just something I love to do to relieve stress. icon_biggrin.gif Thanks so much for your patience in answering my questions, donna. icon_biggrin.gif


    I often do not feed or use my starters for about 2 weeks and don't have a problem. You should be able to do that. In addition you can make starter flakes and refrigerate them if you are going to be gone from home for a long period and then reconstitute them later for use. They last in the refrigerator for up to 3 months. (This is how Donna sent me my starter.) So with this anyone can make sourdough bread.
    Donna M.
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 10:41 am
    Forum Host
    Judy from Hawaii wrote:
    Talk to me about wild yeast...


    Wild yeast is wonderful stuff. It imparts a flavor you will find no other way. It is a bit more challenging to work with, but not hard. It just requires a bit more patience. The more you use it the better it becomes.

    If you would like to try it, I will send you some for a SASE.
    Donna M.
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 10:54 am
    Forum Host
    WaterMelon wrote:
    I'm not always home to feed the starter... and I don't really bake everyday. Just something I love to do to relieve stress. icon_biggrin.gif Thanks so much for your patience in answering my questions, donna. icon_biggrin.gif


    WaterMelon, starters don't require as much attention as you might think. Years ago starters were not refrigerated and had to be used daily to keep them fresh. Today, we store them in the fridge and only take them out when we want to use them. You do have to plan ahead, because you must feed and proof the starter for a minimum of 8 hours before you make your dough.

    As CarrolJ said, you can dry the starter for longer storage. You can also just keep it refrigerated in the wet state for weeks without feeding and still revive it. I usually try not to go over 2 weeks without feeding because the longer you wait, the yeast cells begin to die off for lack of food. Under refrigeration they will stay in a semi-dormant state. The longer you wait, the longer it will take to get it back up to full force. You may have to give it several feedings to accomplish this.

    Some people freeze starters with success, but not all starters will survive freezing. It all depends on the strain of wild yeast. I prefer not to chance it.
    CarrolJ
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 11:07 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna M. wrote:
    WaterMelon wrote:
    I'm not always home to feed the starter... and I don't really bake everyday. Just something I love to do to relieve stress. icon_biggrin.gif Thanks so much for your patience in answering my questions, donna. icon_biggrin.gif


    WaterMelon, starters don't require as much attention as you might think. Years ago starters were not refrigerated and had to be used daily to keep them fresh. Today, we store them in the fridge and only take them out when we want to use them. You do have to plan ahead, because you must feed and proof the starter for a minimum of 8 hours before you make your dough.

    As CarrolJ said, you can dry the starter for longer storage. You can also just keep it refrigerated in the wet state for weeks without feeding and still revive it. I usually try not to go over 2 weeks without feeding because the longer you wait, the yeast cells begin to die off for lack of food. Under refrigeration they will stay in a semi-dormant state. The longer you wait, the longer it will take to get it back up to full force. You may have to give it several feedings to accomplish this.

    Some people freeze starters with success, but not all starters will survive freezing. It all depends on the strain of wild yeast. I prefer not to chance it.


    Thanks Donna for clarification about the 2 week time limit. I try to not go over that also. I sometimes forget to use the proofed starter within the 8 to 12 hour period and when that happens I just pour some of the proofed starter out and feed and restart the counting time to reproof. (As you taught me I could do.) Both of my starters you gave me are still working extremely well. And like you, I love the Red Sea Starter the best of all.

    By the way for those of you who are concerned about those family members who dislike sourdough...the starters that Donna and I use are a very mild sourdough...and both my DH and DS will eat the bread made from them. In fact my DH has decided he likes this sourdough and I can tell him it is...my DS still thinks all sourdough bread is bad...(but he eats it when he doesn't know that it is sourdough!) I don't lie to him, however.
    CobraLimes
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 2:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna, I've been a bread baker for my entire life and have no idea what you mean by wild yeast. Is this the yeast that is airborne and you capture it somehow and let it grow? I'm very confused and thoroughly intrigued. Can you share more information on this, please. Thanks.
    CarrolJ
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 2:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    cobralimes wrote:
    Donna, I've been a bread baker for my entire life and have no idea what you mean by wild yeast. Is this the yeast that is airborne and you capture it somehow and let it grow? I'm very confused and thoroughly intrigued. Can you share more information on this, please. Thanks.


    Since I'm pretty certain that Donna is at work I will answer you cobralimes. The answer is yes. There are many methods to do this and many adventurous persons do so. It can sometimes take several failures doing it yourself.

    Donna and I feel that it is easier and quicker to just acquire some starter flakes from someone who already has the wild sourdough starter. Either she or I am willing to send flakes to people if they will send us a long-self addressed stamped envelope. (I think it takes 2 first class stamps, if I am wrong Donna can let us know when she gets home.) You can ask for our addresses by sending us a Recipezaar email. (we would prefer not to put our address on the forum.)
    CobraLimes
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 6:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    CarrolJ wrote:
    cobralimes wrote:
    Donna, I've been a bread baker for my entire life and have no idea what you mean by wild yeast. Is this the yeast that is airborne and you capture it somehow and let it grow? I'm very confused and thoroughly intrigued. Can you share more information on this, please. Thanks.


    Since I'm pretty certain that Donna is at work I will answer you cobralimes. The answer is yes. There are many methods to do this and many adventurous persons do so. It can sometimes take several failures doing it yourself.

    Donna and I feel that it is easier and quicker to just acquire some starter flakes from someone who already has the wild sourdough starter. Either she or I am willing to send flakes to people if they will send us a long-self addressed stamped envelope. (I think it takes 2 first class stamps, if I am wrong Donna can let us know when she gets home.) You can ask for our addresses by sending us a Recipezaar email. (we would prefer not to put our address on the forum.)


    Hi CarrolJ....
    I am very curious about this wild yeast and would be so excited to learn about it more. I am not a member yet, so don't have access to the email addies on Recipezaar. Would you be kind enough to contact me at cobralimes at hotmail dot com? Thanks so much.
    LuvToBake
    Fri Jan 21, 2005 10:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I must be in the dark. When did all these new threads start??????? I love to make bread or anything with yeast. Adding lemon juice to your dough makes alot of difference. Glad to see alot of new gals and guys on line.

    Glo from the okanagan
    Donna M.
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 1:48 am
    Forum Host
    cobralimes wrote:
    Donna, I've been a bread baker for my entire life and have no idea what you mean by wild yeast. Is this the yeast that is airborne and you capture it somehow and let it grow? I'm very confused and thoroughly intrigued. Can you share more information on this, please. Thanks.


    Hi cobralimes! CarrolJ did a good job of answering some of your questions (thanks, Carrol!). I will post some more info about wild yeast tomorrow evening. It is late now and I have to get to bed because I have a class to go to early tomorrow.
    CarrolJ
    Tue Jan 25, 2005 11:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    For those of you who are especially interested in learning more about sourdough starters and breads made from them you should check out the new thread which Donna started titled "Baking With Wild Yeast Sourdough Starters". Even if you choose not to use a wild yeast starter you will find many helpful hints on that thread.
    Elaine Kirk
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 10:36 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Welcome on board. Yeast baking is lots of fun. Your tummy really likes your yeast breads too.
    Elaine Kirk
    Peggy Lynn
    Sat Jan 29, 2005 2:35 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Substitions for bread flour if any? I havent done this in soooo long~thank you~
    CarrolJ
    Sat Jan 29, 2005 3:16 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Peggy Lynn wrote:
    Substitions for bread flour if any? I havent done this in soooo long~thank you~


    Donna will have to help you on this one. Since I can purchase bread flour so cheaply at Sam's Club...I do that and only use bread flour for all my cooking and baking. 25 pounds is usually under $5.00. It varies of course...I have paid as little as about $3.80 for 25 pounds. Needless to say it is a bargain which local grocery stores just can't compete with.

    I of course keep lots of bay leaves in the bag (I buy them at Sam's too in a large container)...for protection against weevils...and in the summer when it is hot I have been known to squeeze a little space in my deep freeze for it.

    Flour mills claim that weevils are actually in all flour and will hatch if they get warm...they say that cold air is the best preventative...and I HATE weevils and will do whatever it takes to prevent them.

    One time when I lived in California I opened a brand new box of cereal from the supermarket and flying weevils came out...I guess you know that I freaked out!!!!!!!!!!!!

    So buying small bags as needed will not prevent their development only being very careful works. Not meant to discourage bread baking....because I have become an addict of it especially since I met dear, dear Donna who is a blessing to those Zaarites who like to bake bread or love to eat it!
    Elaine Kirk
    Sat Jan 29, 2005 7:52 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Donna,
    Please print your complete name & address. I'd love to get a start of the Wild Yeast Starter. . .hope that's the right name. I'f be happy to send a long SA, stamped envelope. Thanks for your help.
    Elaine Kirk
    3torches@earthlink.net
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