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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Recipe Requests - General / Lookin' All Willy Nilly for Chili...
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    Lookin' All Willy Nilly for Chili...

    Adrienne in Reisterstown
    Sat Oct 02, 2010 7:26 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Looking icon_eek.gif for a hearty recipe for chili.
    Caveat: NOT spicy icon_evil.gif and NO BEANS icon_redface.gif
    Anyone have or can point me to something tried and true?
    Thanks!!
    Adrienne
    Lalaloula
    Sun Oct 03, 2010 8:24 am
    Forum Host
    Hey there Adrienne,

    maybe you would like to try this recipe: Moroccan Chickpea Chili. I liked it a lot and its not hot.
    If youre not a vegetarian, you could add in some turkey or other meat.

    Loula
    Zeldaz
    Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:16 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Here's my husband's recipe, written in an informal style in his words. Omit the beans, add a little more beef, and use anchos for the chiles, they are quite mild.

    Randy's Chili Colorado con Carne
    Ingredients:
    1 boneless chuck roast, approximately 3 pounds
    3 large yellow onions
    3 (or more) large cloves of garlic
    ground cumin, to taste (I use a lot!)
    3 ounces of dried New Mexico chilis
    6 16 ounce cans of beans (I use a mix of black and pinto, sometimes kidney)
    1 16 ounce can of crushed tomatoes

    Break the stems off of the peppers; split them and remove the seeds (unless you really like it hot ). Toss the peppers in a sauce pan with about 4 cups of water and let them simmer for a while. In the meantime, take the meat, onions and garlic and a sharp knife and sit down to a cutting board. Cut the meat into bite-sized pieces, removing most of the fat . Next, coarsely chop the three large onions. Finally, mince the cloves of garlic.

    Toss the meat into a large stock pot with a couple of tablespoons of oil. While it is browning, toss in ground cumin to "taste." When the meat is mostly browned, throw in the onions and the garlic. Stir periodically until the onions are wilted and translucent. Add the crushed tomatoes and turn the heat down.

    By this time the peppers should be ready. You might want to let them cool a little depending on how you do the next few steps...

    I take the peppers from the water with a slotted spoon and "liquefy" them in our food processor (CuisineArt, Robo-Coupe, you pick it). I'll add some of the water to get a slurry the consistency of tomato sauce. Then, to remove the seeds and little bits of pepper skin I run the slurry through a "food mill" (all good home-canners have one of these, right?). You could just go straight to the food mill and save the step of dirtying the food processor. Whatever you decide, you should end up with a couple of cups of a heavy, dark red, pungent sauce. Add the sauce to the meat.

    You can put the beans in any time you want, but remember: they sink to the bottom of the pan and could burn there or overcook into an unpalatable mush. I usually hold them aside until about an hour before I plan to "serve."

    The red water left over from the peppers is used to replenish any water lost as the meat, onions, and sauce cook over the course of the day. I usually just throw it all in, anyway.

    This makes enough chili to keep a household of two in chili for several days. It is amazing all the wondrous ways you can concoct to use leftover chili: chili omelettes is one of my all-time favorites.
    Adrienne in Reisterstown
    Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:19 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Thanks for the responses! Each of these recipes looks great!
    Amberngriffinco
    Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Here's my husband's recipe, written in an informal style in his words. Omit the beans, add a little more beef, and use anchos for the chiles, they are quite mild.

    Randy's Chili Colorado con Carne
    Ingredients:
    1 boneless chuck roast, approximately 3 pounds
    3 large yellow onions
    3 (or more) large cloves of garlic
    ground cumin, to taste (I use a lot!)
    3 ounces of dried New Mexico chilis
    6 16 ounce cans of beans (I use a mix of black and pinto, sometimes kidney)
    1 16 ounce can of crushed tomatoes

    Break the stems off of the peppers; split them and remove the seeds (unless you really like it hot ). Toss the peppers in a sauce pan with about 4 cups of water and let them simmer for a while. In the meantime, take the meat, onions and garlic and a sharp knife and sit down to a cutting board. Cut the meat into bite-sized pieces, removing most of the fat . Next, coarsely chop the three large onions. Finally, mince the cloves of garlic.

    Toss the meat into a large stock pot with a couple of tablespoons of oil. While it is browning, toss in ground cumin to "taste." When the meat is mostly browned, throw in the onions and the garlic. Stir periodically until the onions are wilted and translucent. Add the crushed tomatoes and turn the heat down.

    By this time the peppers should be ready. You might want to let them cool a little depending on how you do the next few steps...

    I take the peppers from the water with a slotted spoon and "liquefy" them in our food processor (CuisineArt, Robo-Coupe, you pick it). I'll add some of the water to get a slurry the consistency of tomato sauce. Then, to remove the seeds and little bits of pepper skin I run the slurry through a "food mill" (all good home-canners have one of these, right?). You could just go straight to the food mill and save the step of dirtying the food processor. Whatever you decide, you should end up with a couple of cups of a heavy, dark red, pungent sauce. Add the sauce to the meat.

    You can put the beans in any time you want, but remember: they sink to the bottom of the pan and could burn there or overcook into an unpalatable mush. I usually hold them aside until about an hour before I plan to "serve."

    The red water left over from the peppers is used to replenish any water lost as the meat, onions, and sauce cook over the course of the day. I usually just throw it all in, anyway.

    This makes enough chili to keep a household of two in chili for several days. It is amazing all the wondrous ways you can concoct to use leftover chili: chili omelettes is one of my all-time favorites.





    sounds good! i'm going to sneak in here and print it out too icon_smile.gif Thank Randy ! icon_smile.gif



    a
    PaulO in MA
    Mon Sep 02, 2013 7:24 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Check the ICS web site. Joe Cooper's Chili recipe on there is a very good no beans chili.

    The Neely's "International Chili Society's Official Chili Cookbook" from the early 1980s is only a few dollars online and a worthwhile purchase if you like chili.
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