Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Archives: Old Topic of the Month Threads / Chantrelle Mushrooms
    Lost? Site Map

    Chantrelle Mushrooms

    Sharon123
    Fri May 03, 2013 2:17 pm
    Forum Host


    This bright yellow to orange mushroom has a convex to funnel-shaped cap 3/8 to 6 inches across with a wavy margin. The mushroom may be odorless, or smell like apricots.
    Blunt-edged, thick, forked (dividing) yellow to orange gills under the cap run down the stalk a short distance. The spore print is pale yellow to creamy.

    The yellow to orange solid stalk is 1to 3 inches long, 1/4 to 1 inch thick, white inside.


    Chanterelles are associated with either conifers or hardwood trees, depending on species. They are often found with oaks in California and Texas. In Scotland, chanterelles grow in mixed forests of silver birch and Scots pine, especially when the forest has plenty of moist, mossy undergrowth. In Fife they are common under beech. They are usually (but not always) found in the same places as wild blueberries. In Spain they associate with sweet chestnut. A walk in the woods after rain should prove fruitful from late July through the Autumn.


    Chanterelles in general go well with eggs, curry, chicken, pork, fish, beef and veal, can be used as toppings on pizzas, be stewed, marinated, sauteed, or used as filling for stuffed crêpes. Of course these are just examples; chanterelles are versatile and can be added as an ingredient to most dishes.

    In European cuisine, chanterelles are often served with venison. A traditional method of preparing these mushrooms is sauteed and then used to make scrambled eggs.

    Many mushroom enthusiasts just like chanterelles sauteed in butter, with a pinch of salt, a clove of fresh crushed garlic and some whipping cream. This recipe is said to bring out the subtle flavor of the chanterelle without masking it with other aromas. This recipe has the added benefit of retaining flavor even after being stored frozen.

    It is a feature of Viennese cuisine.

    Here are some recipes:
    Chanterelle-Marsala Sauce
    White Asparagus With Chanterelles
    Leek and Chanterelle Tart
    Pork Medallions With Chanterelles
    Chanterelle Mushroom Tartlets

    Chanterelle Goulash
    Chicken & Chanterelle Phyllo Cups
    Four Chanterelles
    Chanterelles With Cream Atop Goat Cheese Crostinis
    Roasted Mushrooms


    I used to live in Big Sur, California and we would find these delights under the oak trees after a rain. Heaven!
    Have you ever tried them? Do you have a recipe to share?
    Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites