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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Great- Banana- Nut- Muffins
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    Question:Great- Banana- Nut- Muffins

    cviguera
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 10:43 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Great Banana Nut Muffins

    My question is this:
    Why are you using ml as unit of measure for dry ingredients? It should be in grams or mg instead. Is that a typo or what?
    Zurie
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:03 am
    Forum Host
    cviguera wrote:
    Great Banana Nut Muffins

    My question is this:
    Why are you using ml as unit of measure for dry ingredients? It should be in grams or mg instead. Is that a typo or what?


    I don't see any metric measurements in that recipe.

    But to answer you question: ml is perfectly okay to use in a metric recipe. (ONLY the USA still uses Imperial (American) weights and measures!)

    5 ml = 1 teaspoon
    2.5 ml = 1/2 teaspoon
    15 ml = 1 tablespoon
    125 ml = 1/2 cup

    It's so easy, because everything works in 10's. Millilitre or the abbreviation ml. is simply easier to use than weights: gram or mg., when it's small amounts, such as tablespoons.
    cviguera
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:10 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I was raised outside the US, so metric is better for me. That recipe gives the choice between the two, that's how I saw it. I much prefer to weigh dry ingredients tho, hence the need for grams or mg. Mls are liquid measure.
    I'll go with American version tho, the kitchen is not the place to break out the pencil n paper, lol.
    duonyte
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:18 am
    Forum Host
    When you click metric, the converter changes the recipe to volume measures - which is ml. It cannot change it to weight (grams), because it is not equipped with the equivalencies in grams. For example, one cup of sugar has a very different weight than does one cup of breadcrumbs, even though both are the same volume.

    There are websites that give you volume to weight conversions, but you have to enter each ingredient separately, as it has to be converted from a separate table.

    A US cup is 240 ml in volume.
    Dee514
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:36 am
    Forum Host
    Zurie,
    This very same question comes up quite frequently, and has even been brought up to the powers-that-be to no avail.

    While technically it may be correct, in the US we were taught to use grams and kilograms for dry (metric) measures, and only liquids are measured in milliliters and liters. icon_confused.gif

    I believe this is the only cooking/food related website with a metric recipe converter (on the recipe page) that converts the recipes into ml for dry ingredients instead of the more common (and easier to use) g & kg!

    Food dots own Measurement Converter makes this very same distinction. The (separate) converter only uses ml and L for liquids. They are not also listed with the dry measurements. Only g and kg are listed for dry measures.

    icon_confused.gif icon_evil.gif
    ======================================================
    re: duonyte's post (above)
    There are recipe sites that when you click to change a recipe into metric measures, gives you the recipe in mls (volume for liquid ingredients) and g or kg (weight) for the dry ingredients. King Arthur Flour's website gives you the choice of "volume" "ounces" and "grams" on each recipe page for the recipe conversions which I find the easiest to use (a real pleasure), instead of the "conversion software" we use here which only complicates things for most people. icon_sad.gif
    c'est la vie
    duonyte
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:56 am
    Forum Host
    I think the KA site calculates each recipe and enters it that way into their data base. They control what goes into their database, which contains just a fraction of the recipes we have.
    Zurie
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:56 am
    Forum Host
    Oh, I did not understand that she was talking about the converter!! I thought she referred to the recipe.

    Unfortunately the converter is not very effective, using all those small fractions. I can understand a certain frustration with it. icon_wink.gif
    Zurie
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:59 am
    Forum Host
    Oh, and I should add -- using 5 ml for, say, a teaspoon of sugar, is standard practice. Very small amounts in grams are also a little annoying, as it is easier for us to use a measuring spoon than hauling out a scale.

    Oh well ... to each his own! icon_lol.gif
    Zeldaz
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:14 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I, for one, wish the US would stop living in the past and start measuring things the way the rest of the world does. Our outdated system is based upon ancient British units of measurement. Britain updated to metric, but we did not. It's been this way since the 19th century.
    Metric is so much simpler, yet so many Americans are irrationally afraid of it!
    For me, it's just as easy to pull out my paperback-sized digital scale as it is to pull out a measuring cup and measuring spoon. With the tare function it's easy and faster to add the precise weight of any ingredient to the work bowl, and there are often fewer items to wash.
    Dee514
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:21 pm
    Forum Host
    Agreed, Zeldaz!

    I have slowly been converting my baking recipes to weight/metric, but not my cooking recipes because I'm the type of cook that usually just "eyeballs" the ingredients - I only measure when baking (or if its a new recipe).
    Zurie
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:13 pm
    Forum Host
    Zeldaz wrote:
    I, for one, wish the US would stop living in the past and start measuring things the way the rest of the world does. Our outdated system is based upon ancient British units of measurement. Britain updated to metric, but we did not. It's been this way since the 19th century.
    Metric is so much simpler, yet so many Americans are irrationally afraid of it!
    For me, it's just as easy to pull out my paperback-sized digital scale as it is to pull out a measuring cup and measuring spoon. With the tare function it's easy and faster to add the precise weight of any ingredient to the work bowl, and there are often fewer items to wash.


    icon_lol.gif icon_wink.gif Oh Zeldaz, I am so pleased you said that! The metric system is really simple.

    And I get so annoyed by the F.com converter, with its fussy fractions. I was working at a magazine as a food editor when South Africa changed from Imperial to metric, and we had to adapt pretty quickly!

    Fortunately, (testing, testing and testing) we found that rounding out Imperial against metric worked just fine, even with cakes.

    Now, I post recipes with American measures and with metric in brackets.
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