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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Scandinavian Cooking / Siljans crisp bread from Ikea
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    Siljans crisp bread from Ikea

    Darlene10
    Tue May 02, 2006 12:29 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    A relative brought me a 10" round whole rye crisp bread from Ikea. Does anyone have any idea how I can serve this? The only English on this is instructions to keep it in a dry and dark place. The rest all appears to be Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian.
    Lilla
    Tue May 02, 2006 2:11 pm
    Forum Host
    Darlene10 wrote:
    A relative brought me a 10" round whole rye crisp bread from Ikea. Does anyone have any idea how I can serve this? The only English on this is instructions to keep it in a dry and dark place. The rest all appears to be Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian.


    This may not be the most helpful reply, but when I have had round crisp bread, it is broken into segments (say, quarters) and served with butter (maybe a marmalade, too--depending upon what other toppings you choose to use) cheese, ham or salmon (basically any lunch-meat) and sliced veggies. Enjoy, and let us know how you decided to serve it!
    icon_smile.gif Karen
    Darlene10
    Wed May 03, 2006 10:33 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I just have no idea what I will do with it. It is a very crisp flat bread. I was hoping someone out there would have a great and unique suggestion. I can see using cream cheese and then topping with cut up veggies but it would be very difficult to break (I think).
    stormylee
    Wed May 03, 2006 11:38 am
    Forum Host
    Maybe, in addition to simply topping it with fresh butter and crunching away yummy.gif, you might like to use it in savoury pies? Crush the bread, mix with melted butter and use as a crust for a savoury, non-bake cheese cake! For example:
    200 g crisp bread, crushed
    2 tablespoons chopped, fresh dill
    1/2 teaspoon herbed salt
    100 ml milk
    100 g melted butter
    Mix and press on the bottom of a pan.

    Or you could add crushed crisp bread to the breading mixture when breading fish.

    Or break into bits and treat like cereal: mix with fresh berries or fruit (and a slice of soft bread, cubed) and top with milk. (Adding sugar optional. icon_wink.gif )

    Or use it to add crunch and flavour to dessert trifle type of thingies: break into pieces, toast on the stove on a pan or in the oven at 225 C (450 F), and layer with ice cream and jam of your choice.
    Lilla
    Wed May 03, 2006 2:12 pm
    Forum Host
    stormylee wrote:
    Maybe, in addition to simply topping it with fresh butter and crunching away yummy.gif, you might like to use it in savoury pies? Crush the bread, mix with melted butter and use as a crust for a savoury, non-bake cheese cake! For example:
    200 g crisp bread, crushed
    2 tablespoons chopped, fresh dill
    1/2 teaspoon herbed salt
    100 ml milk
    100 g melted butter
    Mix and press on the bottom of a pan.

    Or you could add crushed crisp bread to the breading mixture when breading fish.

    Or break into bits and treat like cereal: mix with fresh berries or fruit (and a slice of soft bread, cubed) and top with milk. (Adding sugar optional. icon_wink.gif )

    Or use it to add crunch and flavour to dessert trifle type of thingies: break into pieces, toast on the stove on a pan or in the oven at 225 C (450 F), and layer with ice cream and jam of your choice.


    icon_eek.gif My, goodness!!!

    You've just opened up a whole new world of possiblities for me, as well! I tend to buy boxes of crispbread, eat 75% of the contents, and throw the rest away when I am suitably convinced of it's "staleness" (does crispbread get stale?). I get tired of just having it for sandwich-y type meals/snacks. Thanks for all the new ideas!
    Mary the Disturbed Stick
    Thu May 11, 2006 10:46 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Darlene10 wrote:
    I just have no idea what I will do with it.

    Have you ever eaten rye crackers? That's what you have here, only big and round. I grew up eating this stuff; I sure wish I could find it in a store near me!
    Chef #714679
    Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:20 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    crisp bread is a staple in scandinavian countries. Break up the large pieces and serve topped with your favorite cheese. it is good for breakfast or a snack any time. It is also good with peanut butter.
    Olle
    Sat Apr 19, 2008 2:04 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hello! I guess it's knäckebröd you are talking about. The best way to eat it that I know is with butter and "Kalles Kaviar", which is smoked roe in a tube, very popular. I think knäckebröd and Kalles kaviar are two things that a lot of swedes see as typically swedish. We got knäckebröd with the lunch everyday at school when I grew up. /Olle
    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
    Mon Jan 09, 2012 6:32 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    This crisp bread is wonderful with slices of flavorful cheeses, meats and Kalles caviar. It is very popular in Sweden and is stored in wooden boxes with lids. I like a little spread of butter or butter substitute. The possibilities are endless and crisp bread keeps forever and is great to take along on hikes/camping/road trips. Simply break the disks into useable pieces depending on your needs. It will get soggy if you put moist food on it. icon_biggrin.gif
    cowboyjunkie
    Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:49 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    I was watching an ikea video with Jorn the chef and he served those huge round crispbreads. He appears to have some sort of stacking device on the table and I cannot for the life of me find out where to get one! Or what it is called...can anyone enlighten me please? I wondered what the hole in the middle is for!
    stormylee
    Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:20 pm
    Forum Host
    cowboyjunkie wrote:
    I was watching an ikea video with Jorn the chef and he served those huge round crispbreads. He appears to have some sort of stacking device on the table and I cannot for the life of me find out where to get one! Or what it is called...can anyone enlighten me please? I wondered what the hole in the middle is for!


    The one in the herring video? What a nifty gadget! I've never seen one before!

    The hole in the middle was originally - in the olden days - made so that the rye bread could be hung up on a pole to dry, like so:
    http://www.vastavalo.fi/albums/userpics/12698/normal_seitseminen09_131.jpg
    Nowadays most factory-made crispbreads are actually efficient squares!
    cowboyjunkie
    Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:31 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    That's the one - I have never seen one in Ikea. Sure would like one of those! icon_biggrin.gif
    forensichef
    Wed Mar 27, 2013 12:45 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    You have a wonderful high fiber crisp bread that can be topped with hundreds of great things.any compound butter ,seafoods ,pates ,meat spreads.tapenades, curried egg salad. I served one as part of a party spread.just break a few pieces put out the toppers and slap a few together and people will get the idea. icon_lol.gif
    Mike McCartney
    Sat Nov 16, 2013 5:08 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Correct. The hole in the middle was to hang the bread to cool. It was originally hung on a broomstick, and called broomstick bread. When in Sweden, we ate it for breakfast, with butter and cheese.
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