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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Community Cafe / What Are You Reading? 2013 version
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    What Are You Reading? 2013 version

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    M&Mers
    Wed Mar 13, 2013 12:46 pm
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    stormylee wrote:

    Just finished Jane Harris' Gillespie and I, which I absolutely adored - gloriously verbose & old-fashioned language for us word lovers, and a wonderful twist-y plot.


    Thanks for the recommendation, stormylee! I love all three of the characteristics you described in reviewing this book! I've put it on hold at my local library as well as her first novel, The Observations...have you read it?

    M&Mers m-m.gif
    stormylee
    Fri Mar 15, 2013 1:20 pm
    Forum Host
    M&Mers wrote:

    Thanks for the recommendation, stormylee! I love all three of the characteristics you described in reviewing this book! I've put it on hold at my local library as well as her first novel, The Observations...have you read it?

    M&Mers m-m.gif


    I haven't actually! I added Gillespie and I to my shopping basket on a whim when Amazon recommended it - very glad I did. icon_smile.gif
    M&Mers
    Fri Mar 15, 2013 9:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    stormylee wrote:
    M&Mers wrote:

    Thanks for the recommendation, stormylee! I love all three of the characteristics you described in reviewing this book! I've put it on hold at my local library as well as her first novel, The Observations...have you read it?

    M&Mers m-m.gif


    I haven't actually! I added Gillespie and I to my shopping basket on a whim when Amazon recommended it - very glad I did. icon_smile.gif


    They're both ready for pick up at the library so I'll be reading them very soon!

    In the meantime, I'll be starting Ever After, the next installment in Kim Harrison's Rachel Morgan series...it's been a while since the last book came out so I'll be taxing my brain trying to remember what exactly this series is about icon_redface.gif

    M&Mers m-m.gif
    NurseJaney
    Wed Mar 20, 2013 4:26 pm
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    Finished "The Third Twin", Ken Follett's from 1996 -- VERY different from anything else of his I have read. Based in Baltimore -- a tad awkwardly, at "Jones Falls University" -- with some surprising results from a twin study. Surely not his best effort, but had a few interesting twists.

    Downloaded "Test of Wills", recommended here -- first of 17 , hope it's good !
    M&Mers
    Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I just finished reading Kim Harrison's Ever After (a book in her Rachel Morgan series featuring demons, witches, elves, gargoyles and more!). It's a very entertaining series and I'll be sad when it ends, I think, with the next book.

    Next up is (ohboyohboyohboy!) Jodi Picoult's The Storyteller.

    M&Mers m-m.gif
    M&Mers
    Sun Mar 24, 2013 10:31 am
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    Wow, Jodi Picoult never disappoints me! In The Storyteller, she weaves a story from past to present and back again with seamless ease. If you are interested in stories of the Holocaust, then you should read this book. It very often brought tears to my eyes and had me thinking about it long past my bedtime.

    M&Mers m-m.gif
    Studentchef
    Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:06 pm
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    M&Mers wrote:
    Studentchef wrote:
    I just finished reading A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini. Some ome from the old thread, during the summer, when I mentioned The Kite Runner, recommended his second novel.. Anyway, he should write more, the man is a genius.


    Hi Studentchef...I agree that KH is an excellent author...he did write another book. It's called And the Mountains Echoed. I'm third in line at the library for it. In the last thread, I had mentioned that I liked ATSS better than TKR (although they were both excellent novels). Which did you prefer?

    M&Mers m-m.gif

    Here's the splerby for his newest...

    http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/and-the-mountains-echoed-hosseini-khaled/1114193156?ean=9781594632099


    I also prefer The Kite Runner, but only because it took me a while to get into A Thousand Splendid Suns. Once I did, I thouroughly enjoyed it. Now I have to find his third novel.
    Studentchef
    Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I read the novel, The Midwife of Venice by Rebecca Richler.

    It's about a Jewish midwife, living in a 16th century ghetto in Italy, who is asked to help a Christian woman give birth, while her husband has been taken in as a slave on the island of Malta (a common practice). She has to deal with the politics of doing something she is not allowed to do, because Jews and Christians were not allowed to do business together, or help each other out.

    After giving birth to the boy, the father's brother exthorts the money she was given, that would help set her husband free, and finds that the brother has kidnapped the baby in order to kill so he and his other brother could inherit their father's money.

    The novel goes back and forth between Venice and Malta, so you get a good sense of what the Jewish goes through, seperately, until they are finally reunited. Because it is set in the 1500's, the plague plays a huge role in the ending, affecting the parents of the baby, and it is the midwife who comes to the baby's rescue.

    It is a very good read, I do recommend it, if anyone is interested in period novels. It's not historical, although there are quite a bit of prejudices going on, between the Jews and the Christians, so it might come as a culture shock, when you read what some of the Jews think of Christians and vice versa.
    KeyWee
    Tue Mar 26, 2013 6:19 am
    Forum Host
    Thanks for the recommendation ~ sounds like my kind of book (for once, not a murder mystery:D). On my TBR list it goes!

    Oh, oh ~ and thanks for the recos on The Storyteller and the Mountains book, too ~ the list lengthens. I can always depend on you guys!!
    duonyte
    Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:39 pm
    Forum Host
    After weeks of insipid reading that drove me back to old favorites, I've found one I can recommend - "Grandad, there's a head on the beach" by Colin Cotterill. Really, how can you pass by a book with such a title? This is a murder mystery set in an eccentric village full of eccentric characters, but in Thailand, not in England.

    The author lives in Thailand, so I assume that the local touches are all genuine, or more or less so. Apparently this is the second book with the same protagonist, a plucky journalist who lost her livelihood when her mother lead them off to this village in the middle of nowhere.
    M&Mers
    Tue Mar 26, 2013 4:59 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    After weeks of insipid reading that drove me back to old favorites, I've found one I can recommend - "Grandad, there's a head on the beach" by Colin Cotterill. Really, how can you pass by a book with such a title? This is a murder mystery set in an eccentric village full of eccentric characters, but in Thailand, not in England.

    The author lives in Thailand, so I assume that the local touches are all genuine, or more or less so. Apparently this is the second book with the same protagonist, a plucky journalist who lost her livelihood when her mother lead them off to this village in the middle of nowhere.


    Indeed duonyte! icon_biggrin.gif! I'm always attracted to a quirky title! Unfortunately, this book is not at my library although this author is...and some of his other titles are almost as bizarre. I'll look him up on the B&N site when I have more time. Thanks!

    M&Mers m-m.gif
    M&Mers
    Tue Mar 26, 2013 5:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I finished reading Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs. This is currently my favorite FF type of series which features vampires, werewolves, fae, witches etc.

    I'm half way through The Observations by Jane Harris. Stormylee, it's all your fault that I got next to nothing done today icon_evil.gif since you're the one who recommended Gillespie and I...which is sitting on my end table and is the next book to be devoured icon_cool.gif.

    Thanks to everyone for all your recommendations! You guys rock! icon_biggrin.gif icon_exclaim.gif

    M&Mers m-m.gif
    NurseJaney
    Fri Mar 29, 2013 10:49 am
    Food.com Groupie
    NurseJaney wrote:
    Finished "The Third Twin", Ken Follett's from 1996 -- VERY different from anything else of his I have read. Based in Baltimore -- a tad awkwardly, at "Jones Falls University" -- with some surprising results from a twin study. Surely not his best effort, but had a few interesting twists.

    Downloaded "Test of Wills", recommended here -- first of 17 , hope it's good !


    Disappointed with "Test of Wills" -- too many characters and too many had more than one name/reference. Took 1/2 the book to explain "voice", and too many walks through the pastures and paths. Will try the next one --"Wings of Fire" and hope for gold !
    duonyte
    Sat Mar 30, 2013 1:24 pm
    Forum Host
    duonyte wrote:
    After weeks of insipid reading that drove me back to old favorites, I've found one I can recommend - "Grandad, there's a head on the beach" by Colin Cotterill. Really, how can you pass by a book with such a title? This is a murder mystery set in an eccentric village full of eccentric characters, but in Thailand, not in England.

    The author lives in Thailand, so I assume that the local touches are all genuine, or more or less so. Apparently this is the second book with the same protagonist, a plucky journalist who lost her livelihood when her mother lead them off to this village in the middle of nowhere.


    I picked up the first book in this series, "Killed at the Whim of a Hat", and it's equally good Helpful to read first, as you get the background of the characters, but not essential to read first. Worth it, though.
    KeyWee
    Sun Mar 31, 2013 7:10 am
    Forum Host
    Just finished Driftless by David Rhodes and I loved it ~ it was a free download Friday offering from Nook and sometimes they are just fair (or less depending on your interests). This is the first book from this author in 30 years (he had a motorcycle accident and became paralyzed chest down). Now am on a mission for his older books, in particular The Easter House.
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