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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Anyone ever can meat using a water bath?
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    Anyone ever can meat using a water bath?

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    Dienia B.
    Fri Mar 18, 2005 10:28 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    i have some good recipes that ive tried on my reviews please look there too cause i love canning and cooking with what i can you will love the gravy its great i have 2 more recipes til the gravy is published dee
    Reba67
    Sat Jul 28, 2012 10:52 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I do use a waterbath to can meat,I was told to process the meat for 4 1/2 hours.I have been canning my meats for almost 20 years. and only have has a few jars go bad.Not bad odds for the amout of time I've been canning.also remember to cook your meat for 20/30 min.before you eat it.to kill any bactiria.I never eat it straight from the jar.
    Molly53
    Sun Jul 29, 2012 9:52 am
    Forum Host
    Reba67 wrote:
    I do use a waterbath to can meat,I was told to process the meat for 4 1/2 hours.I have been canning my meats for almost 20 years. and only have has a few jars go bad.Not bad odds for the amout of time I've been canning.also remember to cook your meat for 20/30 min.before you eat it.to kill any bactiria.I never eat it straight from the jar.
    Hi, Reba! Welcome to the forums. icon_smile.gif

    The method you describe was the way meat was recommended to be canned back in the day. Modern guidelines based on the most current laboratory research by the USDA/NCHFP (National Center for Home Food Preservation) recommend pressure canning meat for optimum shelf-stable storage safety.

    Not only will your chances of spoiled product be reduced, so will the processing time. Drastically. Freeing you up to do other things besides hover over a canner. icon_smile.gif

    According to the NCHFP, thoroughly cooking canned items at least ten minutes help destroy the potentially lethal toxins formed by the botulinum organism in home-canned foods.
    birdman6660
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 6:38 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    The reason you pressure can meat is to remove Clostridium botulinum bacteria ( botulism) the only way to remove it is pressure canning HOWEVER ...the only way Clostridium botulinum bacteria will be present is when you BUY your meat SOOOO if you fry it or stew it YOU WILL NOT kill botulism unless you cook it for several hours .....you obviously dont pressure cook everything so 4.5 hour hot water bath will remove everything ...if water bathed at a hard boil for 3 hours food poisoning is not possible .. check your lids prior to using .. if they are still sealed they will be fine ... %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

    Clostridium botulinum can be found normally in the stool of some infants.

    About 110 cases of botulism occur in the U.S. per year. Most of the cases are in infants.

    you stand a better chance of getting botulism from honey or corn syrup or even commercially canned products !
    birdman6660
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 7:02 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    AGREED !


    Reba67 wrote:
    I do use a waterbath to can meat,I was told to process the meat for 4 1/2 hours.I have been canning my meats for almost 20 years. and only have has a few jars go bad.Not bad odds for the amout of time I've been canning.also remember to cook your meat for 20/30 min.before you eat it.to kill any bactiria.I never eat it straight from the jar.

    Read more at: http://www.food.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?p=5859150#5859150&oc=linkback
    Molly53
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 10:15 pm
    Forum Host
    birdman6660 wrote:
    AGREED !


    Reba67 wrote:
    I do use a waterbath to can meat,I was told to process the meat for 4 1/2 hours.I have been canning my meats for almost 20 years. and only have has a few jars go bad.Not bad odds for the amout of time I've been canning.also remember to cook your meat for 20/30 min.before you eat it.to kill any bactiria.I never eat it straight from the jar.

    The method you describe was the way meat was recommended to be canned back in the day. Modern guidelines based on the most current laboratory research by the USDA/NCHFP (National Center for Home Food Preservation) recommend pressure canning meat for optimum shelf-stable storage safety.

    C. botulinum is prevalent in soil and marine sediments worldwide, most commonly as spores. These spores are found everywhere, including on most fresh food surfaces. Because they grow only in the absence of air, they are harmless on fresh foods. The danger can occur once the spores begin to grow out into active bacteria and produce neurotoxins that can affect the central nervous system. It can destroy, paralyze, or adversely affect nerves or nerve tissue.

    These spores, which are comparable to plant seeds, can survive harmlessly in soil and water for many years. When ideal conditions exist for growth, the spores produce vegetative cells which multiply rapidly and may produce a deadly toxin within 3 to 4 days of growth in an environment consisting of:
    •a moist, low-acid food
    •a temperature between 40° and 120°F
    •less than 2 percent oxygen

    It turns out that these spores can survive 212F, which is the maximum temperature water ever achieves (at sea level ~ the boiling temperature of water goes down progressively the higher the altitude), no matter how long on the boil. Canning low-acid vegetables, meats, stews, soups and chilis under pressure raises the internal temperatures of the jar contents past that survival point.

    The current guidelines recommended processing times ensure destruction of the largest expected number of heat-resistant microorganisms in home-canned foods.

    Not only will your chances of spoiled product be reduced, so will the processing time. Drastically. Freeing you up to do other things besides hover over a canner. icon_smile.gif

    According to the NCHFP, thoroughly cooking canned items at least ten minutes plus one minute per 1,000 feet above sea level (15 minutes at 5,000 feet) help destroy the potentially lethal toxins formed by the botulinum organism in home-canned foods.
    Zeldaz
    Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    About 15 to 25 people become ill with botulism each year from home-canned food in the US. Some die, some are just paralyzed; neither outcome is acceptable to me. It's not exactly an epidemic, but still something we can avoid. I'd never even consider water bath canning non-acidic foods, period.
    Chef #1800120533
    Sun Oct 13, 2013 1:43 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    icon_biggrin.gif
    Hi, Would pre-cooking meet till done, then dehydration @170F until meat in totally chrisp like jerky ... then water bath be considered safe for shelf life of 5 years? Meat could easily be rehydrated. 3# meat dehydrates down to 1#. Good way to save space.
    Would be very interested in some replies.
    Molly53
    Sun Oct 13, 2013 2:51 am
    Forum Host
    Probably not, chef. At most, commercial vacuum-packed jerky has a shelf-life of something like two years. According to the NCHFP, properly dried jerky will keep at room temperature 2 weeks in a sealed container.

    It is the color and texture of the jerky that will change, it will become darker and harder. The smell will also be slightly different. Once these changes happen, the taste is also off and not recommended for consumption. The leaner the meat, the longer it will keep because it is the fat that starts to break down and go rancid first. Practicing proper hygiene and food safety discipline will help prevent food borne illness.

    The best way to store beef jerky is in vacuum sealed packaging in a cool dark place like the pantry, away from the stove or other appliances and sunlight.

    For best results, to increase shelf life and maintain best flavor and quality, the guidance is to refrigerate or freeze jerky.

    If you're properly rotating your preserved foods, there's no need to store your dried meat for anything like five years.
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