Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Whewre to buy Leaf Lard?
    Lost? Site Map

    Whewre to buy Leaf Lard?

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2
    DrGaellon
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 6:09 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DEEP wrote:
    Simply rendering the fat from bacon, "streak 'o lean" or "fat back" will provided the desired "lard"... As a kid, our lard came straight from the butchered pig's fat renderings. Who really cares if it "leafed"?

    You are QUITE seriously mistaken. Bacon fat is nothing like lard. Bacon fat is salty and smoky. Lard is supposed to be a neutral, nearly-flavorless fat. Leaf lard, from the fat around the kidneys, is the most neutral-flavored of fat anywhere on the pig; fat from other places has more pork flavor. If you can get your hands on uncured fatback or belly, you can render your own lard, but the more meat there is, the more porky the resulting fat will taste - which will not be good in a dessert pie. The lard you got as a kid was, in fact, rendered from pure fat cut from the pig, not from cured-and-smoked bacon, nor from meaty cuts.
    DEEP
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 6:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You couldn't be more wrong Doc. Or could you? I know exactly what you are saying, but let's face it, you can put lipstick on lard, and it's still pork fat. Believe me, I know all about the renderings, the parts of a hog, probably more than you, and most, would even care to know, or take the time to learn about pigs, hogs and fat. Dress it up and sell it as whatever you'd like...declare it coming from this part, that part, or unmetionable parts. Leaf it, flip it, souffle it, or declare it curds and whey and when rendered is is nothing more than what it is. To a "truest" here in the south, pork flavor in a pie crust would be the truest form of a real crust. Sell it on Madison Ave, Doc, and you can't make it any prettier than it is. icon_cool.gif

    I think if you'd take the time to reread my post and absorb the words, you'll have to agree, you've stated nothing I haven't.
    DrGaellon
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 6:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DEEP wrote:
    I think if you'd take the time to reread my post and absorb the words, you'll have to agree, you've stated nothing I haven't.

    I agree to no such thing... but I shan't wage a word war with you. It's not worth the effort.
    DEEP
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 7:02 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DrGaellon wrote:
    DEEP wrote:
    I think if you'd take the time to reread my post and absorb the words, you'll have to agree, you've stated nothing I haven't.

    I agree to no such thing... but I shan't wage a word war with you. It's not worth the effort.


    Nor shall I. icon_lol.gif Ditto!
    Zeldaz
    Sat Mar 16, 2013 7:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Leaf lard (not "leafed") is by definition from a specific area on the pig, the kidneys, and is referred to as "liquid gold" by many bakers. Yes, you can render lard from any pig fat, but leaf lard is only that which is obtained from a specific type of fat, and yields the creamiest product and the most ideal flavor. Here's an explanation from The King Arthur Baking Company website of why it is so prized for pastry:

    "For the uninitiated, leaf lard is a very particular type of lard. It is lard rendered exclusively from the “leaf fat” of a pig. It is fat that is deposited around the kidney of the animal. Why is this important? Well, this fat has a different structure than other fat, which lends itself beautifully to pastry applications.
    “Because of its large crystalline structure, it works exceptionally well in biscuits and pie crust. Lard is somewhat soft even when cold, so when making a pie dough, some of the fat coats the flour, inhibiting much of the gluten development. The remaining fat, which stays in larger flakes, melts at a slightly higher temperature than butter, keeping the layers of flour and water separate. This also allows what little water is in the dough to turn to steam and separate the layers further. This is what creates a pie crust’s flakiness. “
    Greixos Olivella
    Sun Mar 17, 2013 4:18 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I’m completely agree with Zeldaz, and Dr Galleon, BACON’S FAT IS NOT LARD, icon_exclaim.gif The company of my family brings almost 30 years producing leaf lard, which is made of the soft fat of a specific area on the pig, the kidneys and is referred to as "liquid gold" by many bakers, as Zeldaz says. (each pig/sow has only between 800 gr. – 1000 gr. of this fat) and our company has agreements with so many authorized slaughterhouses to purchase this specific kind of fat. In order to we can guarantee that our lard is authentic leaf lard, so most of our customers are pastry bakers of all around Spain, and this is the lard that they need for bake due to is the most neutral-flavored of fat anywhere on the pig; fat from other places has more pork flavour as Dr. Galleon said.
    DEEP
    Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    So, we all agree. Nothing has changed.
    Zeldaz
    Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:57 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    icon_question.gif
    Greixos Olivella
    Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:19 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    that's fine, maybe I misunderstanded something, just I was confirming that leaf lard is not like the other kinds of lard, thank's everybody to join in that discussion icon_smile.gif
    PaulO in MA
    Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I sure did poke a stick in a hornet's nest. icon_biggrin.gif

    Still haven't purchased leaf lard. Looks like mom's baking days are done. icon_sad.gif
    Zeldaz
    Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Have you tried one of the internet sources?
    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2 E-mail me when someone replies to this
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites