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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Archives: Old Topic of the Month Threads / Vinegar in the Garden!
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    Vinegar in the Garden!

    Sharon123
    Fri Mar 08, 2013 1:40 pm
    Forum Host

    White distilled vinegar provides many safe and natural ways to protect and enhance your garden and gardening tools. Not only will you feel good about keeping children and pets (and you!) away from pesticides and other chemicals, you’ll feel great about the low cost of vinegar compared to those other products.

    Kill weeds and grass growing in unwanted places by pouring(or spraying) full-strength white distilled vinegar on them. This works especially well in crevices and cracks of walkways and driveways.For more info on this go to http://www.agardenforthehouse.com/2011/06/got-weeds-use-vinegar-not-roundup/
    Before:
    After:
    Give acid-loving plants like azaleas, rhododendrons, hydrangeas and gardenias a little help by watering them with a white distilled vinegar solution now and again. A cup of white distilled vinegar to a gallon of tap water is a good mixture.

    Stop ants from congregating by pouring white distilled vinegar on the area.

    Discourage cats from getting into the kids’ sandbox with white distilled vinegar.

    Preserve cut flowers and liven droopy ones by adding 2 tablespoons white distilled vinegar and 1 teaspoon sugar to a quart of water in a vase.

    Get rid of the water line in a flower vase by filling it with a solution of half water and half white distilled vinegar, or by soaking a paper towel in white distilled vinegar and stuffing it into the vase so that it is in contact with the water line.

    Clean out stains and white mineral crusts in clay, glazed and plastic pots by soaking them for an hour or longer in a sink filled with a solution of half water and half white distilled vinegar.

    Remove crusty rim deposits on house planters or attached saucers by soaking them for several hours in an inch of full-strength white distilled vinegar.

    Clean a birdbath by scrubbing it often with undiluted white distilled vinegar. Rinse well.

    Get rid of rust on spigots, tools, screws or bolts by soaking the items overnight or for several days in undiluted white distilled vinegar.

    Neutralize garden lime by adding white distilled vinegar to the area.

    Avoid skin problems after working in the garden by rinsing your hands in white distilled vinegar.

    Increase the acidity of soil by adding white distilled vinegar to your watering can.

    Eliminate anthills by pouring in white distilled vinegar.

    Cure a cement pond before adding fish and plants by adding one gallon of white distilled vinegar to every 200 gallons of water. Let sit three days. Empty and rinse thoroughly.

    Sanitize outdoor furniture and picnic tables with a cloth soaked in white distilled vinegar.

    Kill slugs by spraying them with a mixture of 1 part water and 1 part white distilled vinegar.

    To catch moths use a mixture of 2 parts white distilled vinegar and 1 part molasses. Place mixture in tin can and hang in a tree.

    Keep rabbits from eating your plants. Put cotton balls soaked in white distilled vinegar in a 35mm film container. Poke a hole in the top and place in the garden.

    Remove berry stains on your hands by rubbing them with white distilled vinegar.

    Clean plastic patio furniture with a solution of 1 tablespoon white distilled vinegar to 1 gallon of water.

    Wash fresh vegetables with a mixture of 1 tablespoon of white distilled vinegar in 1 ½ quarts of water.

    When cleaning an outdoor fountain, soak the pump in white distilled vinegar to remove any mineral deposits.

    Clean a hummingbird feeder with white distilled vinegar—soap or detergent can leave behind harmful residue.
    From vinegartips.com

    Spray it where you need it. First of all, for those of you who are plagued by pests and little critters in the garden, fret no more. It will keep cats at bay if you spray in areas you want to deter them, particularly that sand-pit you may have in the garden for the children but those cats will insist on using as their own private toilet! Heavily spray full-strength vinegar around the edges of the sandpit and remember to re-apply after it rains.





    2
    For rabbits, soak corncobs. Are those rabbits eating your vegetables, particularly your beans and peas? Soak corncobs in full strength vinegar for a couple of hours until they are thoroughly soaked. You may even soak them over-night if you wish. Then place the cobs strategically around your veggie patch. They will keep rabbits away for as long as you re-soak your corncobs every two weeks.


    3
    Spray the thresholds to get rid of ants. Do you have an ant problem? Again you can apply this full-strength to the ants and they will not come anywhere near the stuff. This is very useful if you find a trail of them making a way into your house. Just spray the thresholds and reapply every couple of days to ensure that they stay away.


    4
    Use as an eco-friendly insecticide. Slugs are real pests, because they eat both vegetables, especially lettuces and plants, especially hostas. In this case, vinegar acts as a poison to the slugs because, if you spray slugs with it directly, they will die. You can treat snails in exactly the same way. However, because vinegar is also a herbicide, be careful where you spray your vinegar. Salvias for example will die, if they are sprayed as a casualty.


    5
    Save your fruit trees. Are your fruit trees being invaded by fruit flies? Try this fruit fly bait, which is deadly and effective. Take 1 cup of water, a half a cup of cider vinegar, a quarter of a cup of sugar and 1 tablespoon of molasses. Mix it all together. Take old tin cans without their lids and make two holes in opposite ends for wire handles. Attach the handles and add an inch of the mixture to each can. Hang 2 - 3 tins in each tree. Check on the traps on a regular basis to refill and clean when necessary.


    6
    Protect your tools. After you have been digging in the garden with your gardening tools, soak them in a bucket of half-strength vinegar. This will act as a fungicide and kill off anything that may be lurking unsuspectingly so that there is no possibility of cross-contamination when you use them next.


    7
    Use as a fungicide. Are your garden plants struggling and your roses suffering from black spot or other fungal diseases? Take 2 tablespoons of white vinegar and mix it with 4 litres of compost tea. Now spray your garden plants with this mixture and see the difference. For roses, the method is slightly different. Take 3 tablespoons of cider vinegar, and mix it with 4 litres of water to control those fungal diseases. Of course, don't forget the compost tea either on your roses to get the best results. For powdery mildew take 2-3 tablespoons of cider vinegar and mix with 4 litres of water and spray your plants. This will help control the problem.


    8
    Increase the soil's acidity. What about your acid-living plants like azaleas, gardenias and rhododendrons? Are they flowering as well as they could be? If not increase the soil's acidity. In hard water areas, add 1 cup of vinegar to 4 litres of tap water. It will also release iron into the soil for the plants to use. And if you have too much lime in your garden, add vinegar to neutralize it.


    9
    Use to fight inappropriate grass or weeds. Do you have weeds coming up in between your paving slabs on our driveway or pathway that you cannot remove by hand? Don't use a herbicide that is known to damage the environment. Use an eco-friendly alternative instead. Take 1 litre of boiled water, 2 tablespoons of salt and 5 tablespoons of vinegar. Mix altogether, and whilst still hot, pour onto the offending plants.


    10
    Improve germination. Did you know that you can improve your germination success rate of seeds by using vinegar? This is especially useful for those seeds that are more difficult to germinate such as asparagus and okra, morning glories and moonflowers. Rub the seeds gently first between two pieces of coarse sandpaper. Then soak the seeds overnight in 500 ml of warm water, 125 ml of vinegar and a squirt of washing-up liquid. Plant the next day as normal. You can use the same method, but without the sandpaper for nasturtiums, parsley, beetroot, and parsnips.


    11
    Stop the hen pecking. And finally, are your chickens pecking each other? Add a tablespoon of cider vinegar to their drinking water, and they will stop
    Vinegar can help keep your tent in proper shape.

    So do you have any gardening tips to share? We would love to hear them! icon_biggrin.gif


    Last edited by Sharon123 on Wed Mar 27, 2013 10:11 pm, edited 1 time in total
    JoyfulCook
    Sun Mar 10, 2013 3:21 am
    Forum Host
    Thanks for that Sharon, I have learnt a few interesting things on this thread!
    Zurie
    Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:44 am
    Forum Host
    Fascinating, Sharon!! My DH is overjoyed at the tip of using distilled vinegar on those weeds that persist in coming up through our paving outside!

    (It's Sunday afternoon -- always quiet and boring -- and a very good time to read everything here I donlt get time for during the week!)

    Wonderful tips. I'll come back for the pest control mixture ... Organic too.
    Sharon123
    Thu Mar 14, 2013 11:04 am
    Forum Host
    Hi Joy and Zurie, I hope you found something you could use. And I hope the vinegar kills those weeds! I'm looking forward to trying some of these tips in my garden this year.
    chicken_feets
    Fri Mar 29, 2013 7:55 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    This is excellent information. Most of it new to me! I have used vinegar on weeds between the bricks, but the weeds here are extra tenacious. Round Up keeps the Georgia Creeper in line. I let all the other wildflowers/weeds go for it. icon_biggrin.gif
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