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    low iron recipes

    susanmaries
    Sat Mar 09, 2013 5:44 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I have hemochromotosis and need to avoid iron. Any good low iron recipes/
    ~Laury~
    Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:31 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I am sure that there are low iron recipes on this site. I actually went to the recipe sorter trying to find some. One thing this site doesn't keep count of is low iron. I will ask some friends and see if they can come up with any.
    Jacqueline in KY
    Sun Mar 10, 2013 11:09 am
    Food.com Groupie
    As far as low iron recipes, I don't think you will find them. I think what you will need to do is find what foods are high in iron and avoid them. I have a friend that her entire family has hemochromotosis and the one thing that I have heard them say they can't have much of and the reason for it, I have no idea, but it is tea. Below is a list of foods that are considered high iron content foods. I'd avoid them, I also read that some nuts are high in iron.

    The list below comes from
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/top-10-iron-rich-foods

    This is the top 10 foods high in iron, I am sure there are more, you may want to google high iron foods, which is what I did.

    Red meat
    Egg yolks
    Dark, leafy greens (spinach, collards)
    Dried fruit (prunes, raisins)
    Iron-enriched cereals and grains (check the labels)
    Mollusks (oysters, clams, scallops)
    Turkey or chicken giblets
    Beans, lentils, chick peas and soybeans
    Liver
    Artichokes

    Also, Vitamin C causes you to absorp iron more, so I'd avoid foods high in vitamin C or taking Vitamin C, too. Off the top of my head, oranges and orange juice are what comes to mind.

    Here is also more info on foods to avoid with this medical problem.

    http://www.irondisorders.org/Websites/idi/files/Content/854256/DietRecommendations.pdf

    In looking around the site, www.irondisorders.org I even found a list of books and one is a cookbook.

    http://www.irondisorders.org/books

    I certainly hope this helps. Good luck with keeping your iron in check.

    Thanks for stopping by and please come back and visit us again.
    duonyte
    Sun Mar 10, 2013 7:40 pm
    Forum Host
    You can use the recipe sifter to identify low iron recipes. I don't know what qualifies as low iron, so I entered less than 5 mg iron per serving under Nutrition. These are main course recipes that came up

    http://www.food.com/recipe-finder/main-dish?iron=L-5

    Unfortunately, right now we cannot confirm that this is actually identifying the right recipes, because the detailed nutritional analysis is not working. (The are working on a fix, as this is a major glitch, cropped up about a month ago).

    Also, you have to check in the nutrition summary box whether any ingredient was omitted from the analysis - sometimes the software cannot pick up some ingredient

    I think you also want to look at some of the resources mentioned, identifying high iron foods that of course you would avoid, and low iron foods that should be the basis of your meals - of course you always have to think about all the other ingredients, not just the main ingredient.

    Hope this helps.
    Zurie
    Mon Mar 11, 2013 9:27 am
    Forum Host
    You have probably also been told by doctors that the best way to keep hemachromatosis safely under control is to donate blood regularly.

    That is the most efficient way of getting rid of excess iron in the blood -- and saving other lives in the process.
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