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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Archives: Old Topic of the Month Threads / Healthy Cookng Oils
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    Healthy Cookng Oils

    JoyfulCook
    Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:38 am
    Forum Host



    There is no light and easy way to chat about the good and bad oils for cooking - so please bare with me while we have a good hard look at the pros and cons of which oils you and I use for cooking

    Not all oils are created equal, so when you cook, it helps to know what to reach for. The amount of antioxidants and healthy fats vary widely in different types of oils. So, too, do smoking points, which are important, since cooking at a high temperature with an oil that has a lower smoke point can produce free radicals and damage the oil's nutrients.




    Canola oil: Canola oil comes from the canola plant, a variety of the rapeseed plant that was cultivated to produce rapeseed that is low in uric acid, which has a bitter taste and which some believe to be toxic in high quantities. Canola oil is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which help reduce the risk of heart disease.

    Coconut oil: The health benefits of coconut oil are hotly debated; while some claim that there isn't a lot of research to prove that coconut oil's high saturated fat content is worth it

    1. Macadamien oil

    Macadamien oil has trumped the crowds favorite olive oil. It is now known as the oil containing the most unsaturated fat making it the healthiest option. With it’s 85% unsaturated fat it beats olive oil which has around 77%. It is an excellent frying oil due to its high heat capacity. Moreover, the oil has no trans–fatty acids and the rate of saturated fat is comparatively low.




    Olive Oil
    Olive oil once known to have greatest amount of unsaturated fats known has been trumped but that doesn’t mean it ain’t healthy and a popular oil. This natural oil that preserves the taste properties and vitamins of
    the olive fruit. Olive oil can be consumed freshly pressed then other oils. Studies show that olive oil is beneficial to assist those suffering from ulcers, gastritis, heart disease, and high cholesterol. Olive oil is best used



    3. Canola Oil
    Canola oil is made from the crushed seeds of the canola plant, this oil is an excellent source of the omega-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid, which the body can not produce. Canola oil is known to protect the heart by its effect on blood pressure, cholesterol, and inflammation. The light flavor and smooth texture is perfect for sautéing, grilling, stir-frying, baking as well as salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Canola oil contains 7% saturated fat, 35% poly unsaturated fat, and 58% mono unsaturated fats.

    [

    4. Peanut Oil
    Peanut oil; as suggested by its name, it is made from peanuts. Nutritionally speaking, this is not the best oil compared to the top 3, yet it is a popular choice. People with health issues relating to trans fats and saturated fats could benefit from this oil. With its high smoke temperature, peanut oil is ideal for frying and deep frying foods. Peanut oil contains 18% saturated fat, 33% poly unsaturated fat, and 49% mono unsaturated fats.

    5. Rice Bran Oil
    Rice bran oil is one of the world’s healthiest oils. This oil is made from rice which is a common food in all countries. Lowering cholesterol, fighting diseases, and fighting free radicals are just some of rice bran oils health benefits. The light and versatile oil is perfect for frying, sautéing, salad dressings, dipping sauces, and baking. Rice bran oil contains 20% saturated fat, 33% poly unsaturated fat, and 47% mono unsaturated fats.
    Alright so we got some good oils now. I personally use the top 3 the most except olive oil. I’m not the biggest fan of olives so I tend to away from it. But Macademia and Canola is my favorites. But what oils should you avoid then? I’ll make it short and list a few bad oils that you should avoid at all cost. These are:
    The following “bad” oils contain high percentage of trans fat or saturated fats. Some, such as coconut oil, even contain more saturated fats than animal products!

    Vegetable shortening
    Hard margarine
    Butter
    Palm oil
    Palm kernel oil
    Coconut oil

    Well if you are still reading after all that information thats just great, its a tough subject and too hard to make it look pretty but it packs a punch and its something we all need to know. If you have any ideas and tips please comment here
    Dib's
    Mon Mar 04, 2013 1:57 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm on the pro Coconut Oil boat. I use it for stir frying. Virgin Coconut Oil I use on the bod and hair.

    I also use Olive Oil for cooking, Extra V. for eating.
    Chocolatl
    Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    It's not quite so simple as "bad" oils and "good" oils. There is some evidence that coconut oil, which is on the "bad" list, actually has health benefits.
    JoyfulCook
    Tue Mar 05, 2013 4:15 am
    Forum Host
    I agree, Coconut oil although generally on the *Bad* list, it does have some benefits and like most things if not eaten to excess its not usually much of a problem. The Asian girls use coconut oil in their hair and thats why it looks beautiful and shiny as well, also used as lot in soaps and beauty products
    Becca70
    Thu Mar 07, 2013 12:26 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Vegetables oils are not healthy, as they generally contain soy, corn, canola and cottonseed oil. All 4 have had their building blocks of life changed with an organism of another species solely to be resistant to more toxic herbicides (weed killing chemicals), which the company patenting the seeds sells to farmers every year along with the seeds. These have not been tested to be safe for people or animals, nor have they been peer reviewed. They are rubber stamped due to a U.S. FDA policy written in 1992, which ignores new studies and even their own scientists.

    Add to that, humans have not developed to tolerate this foreign, recombinant DNA and new allergies, new toxins in food which was previously safe to eat, loss of nutrition, new or more frequent health problems like gastroesophageal reflux disease, and new cancers develop. Even the American Medical Association believes there should be safety testing. Additionally, in America, we do not have mandatory labeling/the right to know if the foods we eat contain GMO's --genetically modified organisms, even though 61 other countries, including China, and Russia have this right.

    A better solution is using olive oil for medium to low temperatures, coconut oil for high temperatures, or simply be healthy and avoid frying.


    Last edited by Becca70 on Fri Mar 08, 2013 10:30 am, edited 3 times in total
    JoyfulCook
    Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:21 pm
    Forum Host
    Welcome to food.com Becca70

    Oils that are not blended are far better! like peanut oil, Walnut oil, Olive oil etc etc. this way you do know what you are eating. I always try to keep oils down to a minimum and just put in enough to cook with not the necessary tablespoons that is in a recipe. This way I can always add a splash or to extra if required.
    Becca70
    Fri Mar 08, 2013 10:21 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Listen to the video or read the transcript of Is Coconut Oil Good for you?
    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-coconut-oil-good-for-you/

    Being from a tree, coconut oil is not yet created from recombinant DNA, which is good. But if you are concerned specifically about your heart, coconut oil is like butter --bad for your arteries and cholesterol levels.
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