Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Perfect Pork Tenderloin
    Lost? Site Map

    Question:Perfect Pork Tenderloin

    annnieq
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:13 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Perfect Pork Tenderloin

    I have two questions ... they seem silly, but I would like clarification please.

    1. Does it make a difference if it's cooked in a convection oven?

    2. I would need to cook two tenderloins for my family. Do I adjust the time per pound weighing both.

    Thank you
    Zurie
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:54 am
    Forum Host
    Timing: read the cook's INTRODUCTION. Click on "more..." to read the entire intro, where she says you do not have to cook them longer if there's more than one.

    In her Directions she spells out very clearly how you work out the timing.

    About the convection oven: I have one too, and yes, I think you need a lower heat. If I made this recipe I'd put my oven on 450 or even less.

    I do think you'd have to press on the tenderloins after the time specified -- if they don't yield to pressure, they're done through. Doing these perfectly can be a little tricky.
    Zeldaz
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:14 am
    Food.com Groupie
    It's best to use a thermometer to determine doneness. Pork is now considered safe at 145 degrees, but some people do prefer it cooked to a higher temperature. Whatever you do, don't overcook it, as that cut in particular has very little fat and it will be terrible if overcooked. Take it out before it reaches your target temperature (five to ten degrees) and let it rest for 10 minutes, it will finish cooking in that time.
    Chicagoland Chef du Jour
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:39 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    It's best to use a thermometer to determine doneness. Pork is now considered safe at 145 degrees, but some people do prefer it cooked to a higher temperature. Whatever you do, don't overcook it, as that cut in particular has very little fat and it will be terrible if overcooked. Take it out before it reaches your target temperature (five to ten degrees) and let it rest for 10 minutes, it will finish cooking in that time.


    Yes, by all means do not rely in the timing, use a thermometer.

    I made this recipe and 60 minutes was too long.

    Drop your oven temperature for the convection at least -25° or more as suggested.
    Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites