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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Strainer recommendations ?
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    Strainer recommendations ?

    CatzCanz
    Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:36 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    I own a hand-crank Foley food mill, but I think I need to advance to something that does more stuff !

    Namely, if I want, say, seedless blackberry jam or ketchup, what does that well ?

    I'd like what I think is called a strainer/juicer that comes with various grades of 'screens' then you can order an 'accessory kit' with yet more screens, to do more stuff ! (Examples here: http://www.pickyourown.org/canningstrainers.htm)

    I'm curious whether I need to go $$$ to get a long-lasting model that does a great job, or will $$ do me just fine ?

    Thanks as always,
    Cat
    Molly53
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:57 am
    Forum Host
    CatzCanz wrote:
    I own a hand-crank Foley food mill, but I think I need to advance to something that does more stuff !

    Namely, if I want, say, seedless blackberry jam or ketchup, what does that well ?

    I'd like what I think is called a strainer/juicer that comes with various grades of 'screens' then you can order an 'accessory kit' with yet more screens, to do more stuff ! (Examples here: http://www.pickyourown.org/canningstrainers.htm)

    I'm curious whether I need to go $$$ to get a long-lasting model that does a great job, or will $$ do me just fine ?

    Thanks as always,
    Cat
    Some of the answer depends on how much you think you're going to use it, Cat. I.E., the cost per use being worth it to you. The last two are going to be significantly neater to use than the first two.

    The lowest tech, probably least expensive thing is something called a Chinese hat or chinois. You can get them with perforations of various sizes, depending upon what you'd like to strain.


    Then comes the Foley food mill (which you'd like to step up from). Also, with screens of various sizes.


    After that, it's something like the Victorio manual food strainer, which forces the juice/pulp into one bowl and the skin/seeds into another. The strainer cones have various sized holes. It's a lot like an old-fashioned meat grinder. You can purchase accessories such as a supplemental motor here: http://www.victoriokitchenproducts.com/products.php?cat=8


    Finally, there's the electric food mill. As with the Victorio, the strainer cones have various sized holes.


    They're all available at specialty stores, some restaurant supply stores or online at vendors like Amazon.
    Zeldaz
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chinese caps aren't cheap, especially at restaurant supply stores! Probably so expensive because the restaurant ones are pretty large. I opted for an OXO food mill with various screens, does the job great, is easier to store, and cost about a third of what the Chinoise was. There are probably some smaller, less expensive Chinoises made for home use, but I haven't found any in my neck of the woods.
    http://www.amazon.com/OXO-Good-Grips-Food-Mill/dp/B000I0MGKE

    If you have a KA stand mixer, there is a fruit and vegetable strainer attachment made for that.
    http://www.kitchenaid.com/flash.cmd?/#/product/FVSFGA
    CatzCanz
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:26 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Molly,

    I like the fact that you can buy the manual version from Victorio, then if you need to step up, it looks like they have the electric attachment available soon.

    I have shoulder problems which have been exacerbated by all the manual cranking and lengthy food prepping I've been doing since I started canning (and now experimenting in small batches like you wouldn't believe). Mango JalapeƱo w/Ginger Liqueur and Plum Amaretto Vanilla Jam to name a few. =)

    Knowing that I plan to increase my planting, my farm visits and therefore canning more significantly this season, electric seems the way go.

    Are you aware of other electric models ? I keep running into tomato and baby food marketed equipment, but not straight 'best used for canning' stuff.

    Thanks !
    Cat
    CatzCanz
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:30 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Hi Zeldaz,

    I bought the exact same OXO food mill you have. I love it ! So easy to clean, and quality made. I think they actually asked someone who cans to help with the design !

    Agreed chinoise aren't cheap, even the one's the same size as our OXO ! Looks like more work too. I looked into buying a well kept 1930s model on eBay but a pal who works in the Water Dept. here said bits of aluminum actually bind to the food as you process it, and to go stainless steel.

    Thanks !
    Cat
    Molly53
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:58 pm
    Forum Host
    If you're having joint troubles and plan on heavy canning, I wonder if an electric unit wouldn't be your best option, Cat.

    As Zeldaz mentioned, if you have a KitchenAid mixer, you can get an attachment for it.


    The Roma strainer is regularly $150, on sale for just under $120 at Chef's Catalog (free shipping). It has loads of terrific reviews.


    The Weston strainer is regularly $140, on sale for just under $96 at Everything Kitchen (free shipping). I couldn't find any reviews.


    A commercial-quality, Italian-made unit will run you something like $600 on Amazon. This model enables the extraction of large quantities of tomato puree, separating it from seeds and skin. With its powerful 1/2 HP motor, this machine is ideal for those who require performance. The hopper, collector and base are stainless steel, the worm and body are cast iron with double hot tinning.
    CatzCanz
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 3:09 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Awww Molly, you're the best. I didn't expect you to go to such trouble. That Roma strainer looks mighty nice for the price !

    Thanks much !
    Cat
    Molly53
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 3:43 pm
    Forum Host
    It IS a pretty thing, isn't it? icon_smile.gif

    YVW, Cat. No bother at all.
    Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
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