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    Kale

    Lorrainz
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 2:11 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I tried to sautee the Kale with onion and garlic, it came out bitter. Is there a trick to cooking this veggie? I never made it before and was disappointed how it turned out.
    Zeldaz
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Many dark leafy greens have a bitter component in their flavor, and some people are more sensitive to it than others. Kale, like parsnips and Brussels sprouts, turns sweeter after it has been exposed to frost. Choose young, tender leaves for less bitterness.
    Also, make sure you don't scorch the garlic, as that turns it bitter.


    Last edited by Zeldaz on Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:46 pm, edited 2 times in total
    Molly53
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:45 pm
    Forum Host
    Mine turned out bitter, too. I added the cooked kale/onions to some soup and it was pretty good that way.
    Lorrainz
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 8:12 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I was really careful with the garlic so I don't think that had anything to do with the taste, but not knowing how to pick out the kale, I may have bought an older bunch, certainly not young. I think I will try again, maybe try with soup. Thank you both for your help.
    duonyte
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 8:18 pm
    Forum Host
    I took a class at Whole Foods and the nutritionist told us to massage the kale - cut it up and rub the pieces between your fingers - to tenderize it. I suppose you could do it while watching TV- ?
    duonyte
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 8:19 pm
    Forum Host
    I took a class at Whole Foods and the nutritionist told us to massage the kale - cut it up and rub the pieces between your fingers - to tenderize it. I suppose you could do it while watching TV- ?
    Zeldaz
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 8:39 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I've made a massaged kale salad and honestly didn't notice any appreciable difference in tenderness. But I do make Portuguese kale soup a LOT, and I just cook until the greens are tender, sometimes it takes longer than others, depending upon the maturity of the greens. Love the stuff, but I enjoy all greens that have that bitter edge.
    pinky kookie
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:53 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    Here is this interesting info about cooking kale, three recipes and more cooking tips:

    HOW TO COOK KALE -
    http://experiencelife.com/article/how-to-cook-kale/
    Let’s hear it for one of nature’s most nutritious foods.

    SHOPPING TIPS -
    For optimum nutrition, buy kale in season. A light frost sweetens kale, so depending on where you live, fall or winter is the perfect time to enjoy it.
    Choose kale from organic, biodynamic or responsible local growers when possible. Greens grown in better-managed soils help you net maximum flavor and nutrition and minimize exposure to pesticides.
    Whenever you shop for kale, buy lots of it because it cooks down dramatically.
    Keep blanched or precooked leftovers on hand to add to the week’s breakfasts, lunches and dinners.

    KITCHEN TRICKS -
    WASHING: Avoid washing kale until just before use, since it will hasten spoilage.

    CUTTING: To make cutting easier, remove any thick stems (just hold the kale upside down by the stems and pull the leaves off), then stack large greens on top of one another, roll them into tight bundles and slice into desired widths. The stems, finely chopped, can be used in soups.

    BLANCHING: Blanching reduces bitterness and softens thick greens, which is useful if you want to follow up with a quick sauté or freeze the greens for later use. To blanch kale, stir leaves into boiling water for a minute or two, drain, then immediately run under cold water.

    BRAISING: Braising tenderizes and adds flavor. To braise, slow cook 1 pound of greens in a ½ to ¾ cup of seasoned cooking liquid (chicken or vegetable stock or wine) or water for about 20 minutes or until greens are tender and ready to eat.

    SNEAK IT IN STRATEGIES -
    Blend a few chopped-up young kale leaves (but not the stems) into fruit smoothies. It’s a great way to get more greens into the diets of the veggie-averse, especially kids.
    Chop, cook and mix kale with grains to add nutrients and flavor to dishes like barley risotto or rice pilaf.
    Blanched and frozen kale can be crumbled into soups, stews, beans and pasta sauces.
    Substitute sautéed kale for cooked spinach in spanakopita, on pizza, or wherever you typically use greens.
    Whip up a quick summer kale sauté with garlic, olive oil, tomatoes and basil.

    RECIPES: KALE 3 WAYS:
    Crispy Kale Chips With Sea Salt
    Asian Greens
    Raw Kale Salad

    MORE KALE COOKING TIPS -
    Blend a few chopped-up young kale leaves — but not the stems or very thick leaves — into fruit smoothies. It’s a great way to sneak greens into the diets of the veggie-averse, especially kids.
    Add kale to breakfast egg dishes. Try an omelet with par-cooked potatoes, caramelized onions and steamed kale — or a scramble made with tomatoes, bell peppers, green onion and kale sprinkled with feta cheese.
    Whip up a quick summer kale sauté with garlic, olive oil, tomatoes and basil. Sauté kale with small amounts of bacon for flavor, then lightly braise it in vegetable stock to soften. Great with roasted turkey, meatloaf or grilled tofu.
    Chop, cook and mix kale with grains to add nutrients and flavor to dishes like barley risotto or rice pilaf.
    Kale is wonderful in miso soup or tossed with rice noodles.
    Kale’s earthy flavor pairs well with hearty meats, beans and sausages. I particularly like kale with braised pork. I often substitute sautéed kale for cooked spinach in spanakopita, on pizza, or layered with ricotta cheese in calzone.
    Blanched and frozen kale is great to have on hand. If you gently break it in the bag, it can be easily added to simmering marinara sauce, soups, stews and beans.

    KALE, MUSHROOM AND CREAM CHEESE SCRAMBLE RECIPE
    Conscious Cuisine®

    Note: see all these recipes clicking the link above.


    Last edited by pinky kookie on Thu Jan 24, 2013 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total
    pinky kookie
    Thu Jan 24, 2013 10:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    And more interesting info found:

    A NEW COOKING TECHNIQUE FOR BITTER GREENS -
    http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/a_new_cooking_technique_for_bitter_greens
    By Matthew Thompson, "Squeeze Your Greens," September/October 2012
    Learn how this no-cook massaging technique can turn your bitter greens into a tender salad in minutes.

    A NEW COOKING TECHNIQUE FOR BITTER GREENS
    http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/a_new_cooking_technique_for_bitter_greens?page=2
    By Matthew Thompson, "Squeeze Your Greens," September/October 2012
    Krislady
    Fri Jan 25, 2013 6:21 am
    Forum Host
    Although it's sort of a pain in the neck, I'm always much happier with my sauteed kale if I blanch it first: About a minute in boiling water, well drained, then squeezed dry, then I go ahead and saute it.
    SarasotaCook
    Fri Jan 25, 2013 8:39 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I have blanched mine first; but too much work for me.

    I saute the kale in a mix of olive oil and butter; as well as onions, garlic, and red pepper flakes. Once the kale is slightly tender, I add chicken broth (just a little) and cover to let it steam a bit to tenderize. Uncover, the broth reduces quickly, I like to finish with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar; and if you don't like the bitterness a touch of honey.

    Lemon or orange and honey are also a nice finish as well. Just a touch.

    I am having some tonight; and since it is with fish; I will add a touch of lemon and honey.
    Chocolatl
    Fri Jan 25, 2013 2:56 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kale is going to have a certain amount of bitterness no matter what you do to it; this may not be the veggie for you.
    Chicagoland Chef du Jour
    Fri Jan 25, 2013 8:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I have never cooked it but I sure love it raw in salads. I make them regularly. They are still good for a day or 2 after prepping.

    Maybe you would enjoy raw better. Both of these are similar. You can use a variety of fruits, fresh or dried.

    I always massage the kale leaves after slicing into thin ribbons.

    Raw Kale Salad With Lemon-Honey Vinaigrette the addition of the cinnamon is amazing!
    Massaged Kale Salad (Aarti Sequeira)
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