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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Seeking- information- about:- artificial- sweetener
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    Seeking- information- about:- artificial- sweetener

    LilyWesLuke
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 10:42 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Wondering what I can substitute for the WW Banana Bread recipe...1 cup of splenda?
    Zeldaz
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 10:56 am
    Food.com Groupie
    For most recipes you'd need to use Splenda baking blend (which contains sugar), as sugar is necessary in many baked goods for structure and browning. A recipe number or a link to the specific recipe is helpful so everyone is on the same page. icon_smile.gif
    LilyWesLuke
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 11:29 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Zeldaz
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 11:46 am
    Food.com Groupie
    That recipe already calls for Splenda. Are you asking about substituting another artificial sweetener for the Splenda? The following info is from allrecipes.com:

    "Saccharine is 200 to 700 times sweeter than sugar. It can be used in baked goods. However, the manufacturer recommends substituting it for only half of the sugar in a recipe. Substitute 6 (1-gram) packets for each ¼ cup sugar. It is sold under the name Sweet and Low®.

    Aspartame is 160 to 220 times sweeter than granulated sugar. This sweetener is heat-sensitive: it loses its sweetening power when heated, and cannot be used for cookies or cakes. The manufacturer does recommend trying it in no-bake pies and in puddings after they have been removed from the heat. Substitute 6 (1-gram) packets for each ¼ cup of sugar. It is sold under the names Equal® and NutraSweet®.

    Acesulfame potassium is 200 times sweeter than sugar. It is heat-stable, so it can be used in baking and cooking. Use acesulfame K in combination with granulated sugar when baking. Substitute 6 (1-gram) packets for each ¼ cup sugar. It is sold under the brand names Sunette® and Sweet One®.

    Sucralose is made from sugar, but is not metabolized by the body like sugar. It is 600 times sweeter than granulated sugar. Granular sucralose is the form used when baking. Substitute 1 cup granular sucralose for each cup of sugar called for in the recipe. Recipes made with this product tend to bake faster than usual, so check for doneness sooner than the recipe specifies. It is sold under the Splenda® brand name."

    By the way, if you need info on low-carb cooking, there is a forum that might be helpful. http://www.food.com/bb/viewforum.zsp?f=20
    LilyWesLuke
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 12:12 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    No, actually I would like to not use that much of an artificial product. Looking for sweetness - more applesauce, honey?
    DrGaellon
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 12:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You'd need to replace it with sugar. Nothing else will give you the structure you need. Applesauce or honey would result in a dense hockey puck.
    Zeldaz
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 12:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    They would also add a lot of liquid that would have to be accounted for by increasing dry ingredients. You best bet might be to search for a recipe formulated with honey. The Recipe Sifter yielded a ton of them. http://www.food.com/recipe-finder/all/banana-bread?inclingre=1550&exclingre=861,2257,1141,14928,2421,5201,1152,1470,1484,1671
    Zurie
    Sun Jan 20, 2013 1:49 pm
    Forum Host
    If you're okay with sugar -- use a cup of sugar.

    Otherwise, maybe look for another similar recipe. The artificial sweeteners are tricky to use in baking.
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