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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Recipe Requests - General / Leeks, GREEN parts only
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    Leeks, GREEN parts only

    sofie-a-toast
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:08 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi all,

    I recently made a recipe that called for a lot of leeks but only the white and light green parts. I saved the rest of the leeks, not wanting to waste them but can't figure out how to use them. It seems that most recipes that call for leeks just want the white part or at least want the whole leek. Any ideas out there for the stalky green part of leeks? Tried and true recipes would be preferred! This is a hard one to search for! Also, I'm a vegetarian and don't care much for eggs.

    Thanks so much! - Sofie
    bullydog1975
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:47 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I save mine for stocks. Just throw them in a baggy and freeze. Do that with other vegetable remnants until you have enough to make a batch. icon_wink.gif
    duonyte
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:49 pm
    Forum Host
    I've only used them for making broth . They're pretty tough.
    pinky kookie
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 9:02 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    I don't like to waste any food either, so I grate the green part of a leek (with a cheese grater), freeze in a zip lock bag and put it into salads and use them as they were green onions, or add it in some casseroles for extra flavor.
    Zeldaz
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 9:05 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I save all non-cole crop vegetable trimmings for stock in a gallon ziploc in my freezer. I use them for poultry and meat stocks, but they would make great vegetable broth as well. Cole crops (members of the cabbage family) make for bad-smelling broths and stocks, so those trimmings go into the trash.
    You could also probably dehydrate the leaves and pulverize them for a leek powder to add to soups, stews, etc. Leek leaves are pretty fibrous and unpleasant unless cooked to death, but the powder should not be an issue.
    Kerfuffle-Upon-Wincle
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 9:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I have a small package of dried leeks that I bought at an local ethnic market ~ I toss a 2-3 tablespoons into the pot when I make soup! I've also soaked them, then added them to bread dough.

    If you have a dehydrator, you might try your hand at drying them. Avoid using the most fibrous ones ~
    SarasotaCook
    Sat Jan 12, 2013 2:45 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Stock for me as well. Just freeze and use to make a great chicken or vegetable stock.
    sofie-a-toast
    Mon Jan 14, 2013 5:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for your help all! I am definitely going to try making stock! I never have before so this will be a new project
    SarasotaCook
    Mon Jan 14, 2013 6:11 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    For stock, the only scraps I tend to stay away from are strong type of foods like too many peppers, brussels sprouts, cabbage, etc. A single flavorful pepper may be nice; but usually they can over power.

    Stick with mushroom stems, carrots, parsnips, turnips, celery, onions, the leaves from these plants, leeks, even a hint of some fennel. But all these strong veggies, you have to be careful of.
    Karyl Lee
    Mon Jan 14, 2013 9:27 pm
    Forum Host
    I always use the whole leek except for the very outermost really tough green parts. I take the majority of the greenest and cut them into matchsticks and saute them first before I add them into soup, and then just carry on with the rest of the soup after they get softened.
    Here's one recipe of mine that details it a bit more: Tomato soup with eggplant and ginger
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