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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / African Cooking / Happy Holidays, Everybody
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    Happy Holidays, Everybody

    Molly53
    Sat Dec 22, 2012 5:28 pm
    Forum Host
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    Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday which celebrates family, community and culture. Celebrated from 26 December thru 1 January, its origins are in the first harvest celebrations of Africa from which it takes its name. The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first fruits" in Swahili, a Pan-African language which is the most widely spoken African language.

    The first-fruits celebrations are recorded in African history as far back as ancient Egypt and Nubia and appear in ancient and modern times in other classical African civilizations such as Ashantiland and Yorubaland. These celebrations are also found in ancient and modern times among societies as large as empires (the Zulu or kingdoms (Swaziland) or smaller societies and groups like the Matabele, Thonga and Lovedu, all of southeastern Africa. Kwanzaa builds on the five fundamental activities of Continental African "first fruit" celebrations: ingathering; reverence; commemoration; recommitment; and celebration. Kwanzaa, then, is: a time of ingathering of the people to reaffirm the bonds between them; a time of special reverence for the creator and creation in thanks and respect for the blessings, bountifulness and beauty of creation; a time for commemoration of the past in pursuit of its lessons and in honor of its models of human excellence, our ancestors; a time of recommitment to our highest cultural ideals in our ongoing effort to always bring forth the best of African cultural thought and practice; and a time for celebration of the Good, the good of life and of existence itself, the good of family, community and culture, the good of the awesome and the ordinary, in a word the good of the divine, natural and social.

    The African-American Branch
    Rooted in this ancient history and culture, Kwanzaa develops as a flourishing branch of the African American life and struggle as a recreated and expanded ancient tradition. Thus, it bears special characteristics only an African American holiday but also a Pan-African one, for it draws from the cultures of various African peoples, and is celebrated by millions of Africans throughout the world African community. Moreover, these various African peoples celebrate Kwanzaa because it speaks not only to African Americans in a special way, but also to Africans as a whole, in its stress on history, values, family, community and culture.

    Gifts are given mainly to children, but must always include a book and a heritage symbol. The book is to emphasize the African value and tradition of learning stressed since ancient Egypt, and the heritage symbol to reaffirm and reinforce the African commitment to tradition and history.

    The colors of Kwanzaa are black, red and green and can be utilized in decorations for Kwanzaa. Also, decorations should include traditional African items, i.e., African baskets, cloth patterns, art objects, harvest symbols, etc.

    NGUZO SABA
    (The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa)

    Umoja (Unity)
    To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.

    Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)
    To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.

    Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)
    To build and maintain our community together and make our brother's and sister's problems our problems and to solve them together.

    Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics)
    To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to profit from them together.

    Nia (Purpose)
    To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

    Kuumba (Creativity)
    To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

    Imani (Faith)
    To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

    The greetings during Kwanzaa are in Swahili. Swahili is a Pan-African language and is chosen to reflect African Americans' commitment to the whole of Africa and African culture rather than to a specific ethnic or national group or culture. The greetings are to reinforce awareness of and commitment to the Seven Principles. It is: "Habari gani?" and the answer is each of the principles for each of the days of Kwanzaa, i.e., "Umoja", on the first day, "Kujichagulia", on the second day and so on.

    It is important to note Kwanzaa is a cultural holiday, not a religious one, thus available to and practiced by Africans of all religious faiths who come together based on the rich, ancient and varied common ground of their heritage.

    Kwanzaa foods might include Fruit Salad, Cream of Peanut Butter Soup, Fried Okra, Louisiana Chicken and Sausage Gumbo (The Real Stuff) with rice, Perfect Southern Greens (Kale, Beet, Collard Greens, Mustard), Toasted Coconut and Banana Drop Biscuits, Sweet Cornbread, and Sweet Potato Pie, Iced Green Tea With Ginger and Mint, Quick Ginger Beer
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