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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Ultimate Butternut Squash Soup!
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    Question:Ultimate Butternut Squash Soup!

    Baway
    Tue Oct 09, 2012 12:09 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Ultimate Butternut Squash Soup!

    what is the best way to peel the squash? Possibly steam it first?
    Zeldaz
    Tue Oct 09, 2012 12:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Microwave it for 3 minutes and it will be easier to peel.
    Baway
    Tue Oct 09, 2012 12:35 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank You ! Thank You!
    PaulO in MA
    Tue Oct 09, 2012 3:56 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I just made butternut squash soup on Saurday. I split the squash lengthwise, spooned out the seeds, rubbed olive oil on the cut sides, and placed it face down in a 13- by 9-inch pan. Placed it in a 325 F oven until a fork inserted went in easily. Let it cool a bit, and the skin peels off easily. Then, just mashed it in pan for the soup.

    I separated the seeds and soaked them a in salted water a while, drained, and placed in a cast iron skillet in the oven with the squash.
    ala-kat
    Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I just very recently saw this tip, and have not yet tried it but plan to. It was for spaghetti squash but I feel it would work for any hard squash.

    Take a metal skewer or knife and poke a fair amount of holes in the squash. Roast (whole) as you normally would. Once done, cut in half, discard the seeds and scoop the squash out. It is now ready to use in your recipes.

    Those darn things are a pill to work with raw icon_biggrin.gif

    oops...saw that you need the squash raw for this recipe, so this would not work here (adjustments could be made, but that is another thread). Still think this is a good tip.
    Riverside Len
    Wed Oct 10, 2012 12:41 am
    Food.com Groupie
    The easiest way is to bake it whole. Let it cool a bit and you can easily cut into it and scoop it out. Set it aside and make the soup as directed but hold out the squash until the last and then add it into the otherwise finished soup. Baking it first will not only make peeling it a breeze but will improve the flavor.
    ala-kat
    Wed Oct 10, 2012 1:11 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Riverside Len wrote:
    The easiest way is to bake it whole. Let it cool a bit and you can easily cut into it and scoop it out. Set it aside and make the soup as directed but hold out the squash until the last and then add it into the otherwise finished soup. Baking it first will not only make peeling it a breeze but will improve the flavor.


    I wholeheartedly agree. Roasting it will bring out much better flavor. Will be roasting them whole from now on, just seems so much easier icon_biggrin.gif
    Chicagoland Chef du Jour
    Wed Oct 10, 2012 7:26 am
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    I think roasting the (cubed) squash in the oven until caramelized would really make the flavors pop!
    Connie Lea
    Wed Oct 10, 2012 9:04 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Riverside Len wrote:
    The easiest way is to bake it whole. Let it cool a bit and you can easily cut into it and scoop it out. Set it aside and make the soup as directed but hold out the squash until the last and then add it into the otherwise finished soup. Baking it first will not only make peeling it a breeze but will improve the flavor.


    I've been doing my squash that way for quite awhile. The recipe I had for that was to rub oil all over the squash and then poke a few holes in it. I quit using the oil - don't know why I had to do it in the first place as it doesn't add anything to the flavor, just makes it messy.
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