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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Amish White Bread
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    Question:Amish White Bread

    OneCrazyMomma
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:10 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Amish White Bread This is my first time making bread, I followed the directions but my dough never did rise...
    Zeldaz
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Then the yeast was dead, or was killed, or the temperature was too low or too high. What was the temperature of the water you used? "Warm" means about body temperature.
    duonyte
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:26 pm
    Forum Host
    Zeldaz is right - and killing the yeast is the most common reason for failure to rise.

    When you sprinkled in the yeast in the sugar water - did it start to grow into a soft beige creamy looking blob? If it did not, then the water likely was too hot.

    I actually like using room temperature water - it can mean that the dough will take a little longer to rise, but generally does not make much difference.
    DrGaellon
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    I actually like using room temperature water - it can mean that the dough will take a little longer to rise, but generally does not make much difference.

    I prefer to let my dough rise more slowly - it develops more flavor that way. I'll even pop it in the refrigerator overnight.
    duonyte
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 4:33 pm
    Forum Host
    Overnight rise in the fridge is the easiest way to develop the flavor, no question.
    OneCrazyMomma
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:09 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks for all the responses. I did have the water too hot, I turned the tap water as hot as it would go. I will shot for a lower temperature next time.
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