Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Gardening, Herbs, Spices and More / SO Cool! DIY Berry Picker
    Lost? Site Map

    SO Cool! DIY Berry Picker

    Molly53
    Mon Oct 01, 2012 2:29 am
    Forum Host


    This berry picker is made out of PVC pipe. Heat is used to shape the plastic. Two "fingers" at the working end do the picking. The berry then falls through the pipe and lands in a plastic bag tied to the other end.

    From the creator: Always work in areas with good ventilation. If you do get caught in a cloud of smoke, hold your breath and move to clean air.

    When heating PVC with a gas stove or propane torch, try not to let it burn. Smoke from burning PVC is bad. With experience one burns it less and less. Don't panic the first time you do burn some. It scorches, but doesn't immediately burst into flame. Move the material away from the flame and try again. Don't breathe the smoke. Smoke avoidance comes naturally for most people.

    While heating PVC over a gas flame, keep the plastic an appropriate distance from the flame. Avoid scorching the surface before the inside can warm up. It takes time for heat to travel to the center of the material being heated.

    Keep the plastic moving, and keep an eye on the state of the plastic. When heated, the PVC material is flexible, like leather. Beyond this stage, you risk scorching it.

    A word from James, the plastic engineer -- "Just a word of warning, PVC can handle some high heats but if it catches fire, you wont be able to put it out, it does not need oxygen to burn so don't do this inside".

    I do work inside, but my house is made of cement and has good ventilation. MAKE SURE THAT YOU HAVE GOOD VENTILATION.
    Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites