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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Asian Cooking / Making sushi rice in bamboo steamer . . .
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    Making sushi rice in bamboo steamer . . .

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    Rinshinomori
    Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:52 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Galley Wench wrote:
    I love to use 'different' methods . . . glad it turned out! Now, what the heck is the 'vessel' that you made rice in a child. . . .what was the process. Don't tell me I need another kitchen gadget . . . icon_biggrin.gif


    The picture shows what is called kamado and it was what most Japanese used for making rice until perhaps sometime in late 50's. Surprisingly, rice making in Japan evolved from that to this simple on/off electric rice cooker


    However, some of the better Japanese sushi restaurants still make their rice using kamado because rice taste better that way. You had to watch it closely though because the top had to be adjusted depending on timing and the sound made while rice was being cooked.

    I sometimes make rice in this as well. This is good for making what is called takikomi (mixed rice of vegetables and sometimes fish).



    BTW, very nice to see you here again Galley Wench. Are you still visiting Mexico?
    daniela c
    Wed Jul 25, 2012 8:15 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    deleted message
    daniela c
    Wed Jul 25, 2012 8:18 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    icon_biggrin.gif Is this the first time making sushi rice? By making rice in a steamer, you do not own a rice maker right? But, rice can be made in a pot, clay pot easily too and perfectly (sometimes better than electric maker) and that's how it was made in old days when I was growing up. We had something like this when I was small - even outdoor cooking and it was my job starting around age 6-7 to make rice in Japan.



    Hi, i am a university student in Design from Italy. Could you please tell me which is the functionality of the different parts of the pot in the picture you posted? Thanks in advance
    Member #610488
    Thu Jul 26, 2012 1:59 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    daniela c wrote:
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    icon_biggrin.gif Is this the first time making sushi rice? By making rice in a steamer, you do not own a rice maker right? But, rice can be made in a pot, clay pot easily too and perfectly (sometimes better than electric maker) and that's how it was made in old days when I was growing up. We had something like this when I was small - even outdoor cooking and it was my job starting around age 6-7 to make rice in Japan.



    Hi, i am a university student in Design from Italy. Could you please tell me which is the functionality of the different parts of the pot in the picture you posted? Thanks in advance


    The picture is of a kamado - a wood charcoal burning rice cooker, from Japan. In the days before electricity, this all in one cooker made rice for the whole family. The wood charcoal fire would be started in the lower open area in a ceramic or stainless steel bowl and right above it sits the rice container. The ceramic or stainless steel rice container separates from the fire cooking container. The wooden top is heavy enough to stay on the rice container yet allows steam that is built up in the rice container to escape at a controlled rate. Kind of like an early pressure cooker.
    Rinshinomori
    Thu Jul 26, 2012 4:42 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    daniela c wrote:
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    icon_biggrin.gif Is this the first time making sushi rice? By making rice in a steamer, you do not own a rice maker right? But, rice can be made in a pot, clay pot easily too and perfectly (sometimes better than electric maker) and that's how it was made in old days when I was growing up. We had something like this when I was small - even outdoor cooking and it was my job starting around age 6-7 to make rice in Japan.



    Hi, i am a university student in Design from Italy. Could you please tell me which is the functionality of the different parts of the pot in the picture you posted? Thanks in advance


    Hello daniela c! The kamado I posted is the modern recreation of what we used to use until perhaps late 1950's in Japan. This one shows the bottom portion where you put in liquid fuel. In the old days, it was either wood or sometimes gas. I used wood.

    The rice is cooked in the container with flared edge. The bottom flared edge was used as base and seated. The container itself was made of metal. The wooden top was made with two horizontal edge on top for grabbing with hands. As rice cooked the steam escaped from the sides of wooden top. Sometimes towards the end of rice making, the top was adjusted a little to let the steam escape to firm up the rice somewhat.

    Here is another look at older version: This is very close to the one we used in our family in Tokyo.



    Sushi masters still use kamado to cook their rice and swears by the quality of rice made using this method.
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