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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Diabetic Cooking / Diabetics! Your super foods ~ right here --->
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    Diabetics! Your super foods ~ right here --->

    Andi of Longmeadow Farm
    Mon Apr 09, 2012 9:06 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Super food – a term used to describe a food high in phytonutrient content and considered especially nutritious or otherwise beneficial to health and well-being. There has been much research into the link between nutrition and disease prevention and some foods stack up better than others.

    1. Beans. Beans, such as kidneys, pintos, lentils, and red or black beans, make a great meat substitute. Try making black-bean “burgers,” pasta with lentil sauce (instead of meat sauce), or a ground-bean dip like hummus.

    2. Dark green, leafy vegetables. A spinach salad makes a great addition to any meal. And for more variety, try some different greens in your salads. Also try adding kale or collard greens to soups, casserole dishes, rice, or even a smoothie.

    peach.gif 3. Citrus fruits. We have so many fruits to choose from, but try to eat at least one citrus fruit each day.

    4. Sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes always make a good substitute for white potatoes because they have a lower glycemic index. Add sweet potatoes to meals, or mix mashed sweet potatoes into the goodies you bake. I even add mashed sweet potatoes to my kids oatmeal, waffles--and macaroni and cheese.

    grapes.gif 5. Berries. It’s so easy to add fresh or frozen berries to everything, from hot cereal to a salad. And of course, they make great snacks, too.

    tomato.gif 6. Tomatoes. Tomatoes are so versatile. I like to cook them up on the stove into homemade tomato sauce, which I then use with pasta and homemade pizzas. The second ingredient in most store-bought pasta sauces is high-fructose corn syrup, so make your own and avoid the extra carbs and calories. ]

    7. Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids. Salmon, mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, and albacore tuna are all fatty fish that are high in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids can help you lower triglycerides and increase HDL (good cholesterol)--2 substances found in the bloodstream whose levels are often out of balance in people with diabetes.

    8. Whole grains . The first step to getting more whole grains into your diet is to trade out any baked goods made from white flour and exchange them for whole-wheat foods. If you've already done that, start to think about using more unprocessed, whole grains such as barley, wild rice, rolled oats, quinoa, and bulgur.

    9. Nuts. These make a great snack because they're low in carbs and high in protein and healthy fats. Nuts, however, are not a low-calorie food, so watch portion sizes. Think about eating 1 ounce of nuts; then read the food label to determine how many nuts make up an ounce.

    10. Fat-free milk and yogurt. Milk and yogurt make great snacks, too. And be sure to try Greek yogurt, which provides significantly more protein. Both Greek and American yogurts contain probiotics, which are good for the health of our digestive systems.


    Last edited by Andi of Longmeadow Farm on Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:39 pm, edited 1 time in total
    PaulaG
    Tue Apr 10, 2012 8:38 am
    Forum Host
    Andi, you have a way with words. The information is wonderful. Thank you so much for sharing with us.
    Andi of Longmeadow Farm
    Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks, Paula, I got the info from the American Diabetic Association, added the cute things, and am glad that it makes sense icon_smile.gif
    lauralie41
    Thu Apr 12, 2012 6:53 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Great information Andi!
    ~Laury~
    Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:04 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Andi, this is great! I've printed it for Tom so he can change, hopefully, the way we eat. He has Type ll and I have supplemental diabetes. Supplemental diabetes means my doctors gave it to me by keeping me on Prednisone too long.
    Andi of Longmeadow Farm
    Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:24 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    ~Laury~ wrote:
    Andi, this is great! I've printed it for Tom so he can change, hopefully, the way we eat. He has Type ll and I have supplemental diabetes. Supplemental diabetes means my doctors gave it to me by keeping me on Prednisone too long.


    My dearest Laury!

    It's great seeing you! icon_smile.gif Welcome to our humble abode!

    This is the place to start, and we're glad to see you, and hope you come and visit a lot!
    PaulaG
    Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:43 am
    Forum Host
    ~Laury~ wrote:
    Andi, this is great! I've printed it for Tom so he can change, hopefully, the way we eat. He has Type ll and I have supplemental diabetes. Supplemental diabetes means my doctors gave it to me by keeping me on Prednisone too long.


    Laury, I'm with Andi, it is so good to see you. Andi does give out some wonderful info. Please stop in more we would love to have you. Paula
    ~Laury~
    Sun Apr 22, 2012 3:32 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you Andi and Paula for welcoming me. I will be back.
    lauralie41
    Sat Apr 28, 2012 6:44 am
    Food.com Groupie
    wave.gif Hi Laury! Great to see you and please visit us often!
    Zurie
    Sat Apr 28, 2012 2:08 pm
    Forum Host
    Hi Andi! You seem to be in several places at the same time! icon_wink.gif

    Anyway, just adding my two-pence worth:

    * EVERYONE is different, so I do not mean this to sound as if it's gneral rules!!!

    Beware eating wholegrain foods just because they are healthy. If you do, TEST your blood glucose 1 hr and then 2 hrs after eating it. If it's too high, you might have to cut down drastically on wholegrains. (After all, it's only a healthier form of plain carbohydrates, and carbs turn into glucose pretty fast).

    Remember cheeses! It's filling, chock full of calcium, delicious, and most cheeses are very low in carbs.

    Another filling and highly nutritious standby (for salads, and as a spread on low-carb crackers, etc) is avocado.

    I also find that beans (dried, reconstituted or canned) can be quite high in carbs. I think -- do your finger prick tests. Often it depends on what is added to the beans to make then taste nice which is the culprit.
    Andi of Longmeadow Farm
    Mon Apr 30, 2012 9:04 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi Zurie! Thanks for your additions....and I agree, everyone is different. This is just a basic list showing some super foods, not an inclusive list at all. Just food for thought. icon_smile.gif
    debnova
    Mon Jul 02, 2012 1:12 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    icon_smile.gif Great information, but I'd like to add that SOME diabetics, especially those with "uncontrolled" glucose levels (probably from Not following guidelines) are susceptible to Higher Postassium levels and that can be dangerous.I'm sure there are diabetics on this site that are in that category, but thank goodness were seeking information like this!! Have Doctor monitor for this and you'd be fine. I recently had to go on a fast, low-potassium diet cause it spiked and that can affect your heart. I immediately lowered my level to a safe number. Just saying it might be an issue if your having trouble controling your levels. Thanks.
    Andi of Longmeadow Farm
    Mon Jul 09, 2012 8:10 am
    Food.com Groupie
    debnova wrote:
    icon_smile.gif Great information, but I'd like to add that SOME diabetics, especially those with "uncontrolled" glucose levels (probably from Not following guidelines) are susceptible to Higher Postassium levels and that can be dangerous.I'm sure there are diabetics on this site that are in that category, but thank goodness were seeking information like this!! Have Doctor monitor for this and you'd be fine. I recently had to go on a fast, low-potassium diet cause it spiked and that can affect your heart. I immediately lowered my level to a safe number. Just saying it might be an issue if your having trouble controling your levels. Thanks.


    Hi debnova! Yes, you are so right! We always recommend you go see your doctor before making any change to your diet, diabetic wise. These were given only as a guideline, and please check with your doctor first....

    I hope you are doing better, debnova..thanks for post!
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