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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Canning Dried Beans
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    Canning Dried Beans

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    Molly53
    Tue Aug 23, 2011 12:41 pm
    Forum Host
    If you read through this thread from the start, you'll see that quite a few of our members can dry beans.

    For example:
    Chef on the coast wrote:
    I do it all the time. Sort through the beans first and get rid of discolored and yucky ones. Be on the lookout for little rocks as well. Rinse. Quart jars need 1 cup dry beans, 1 tsp salt and boiling water to within 1/2 inch of top. Pints need 2/3 cup dry beans, 1/2 tsp salt and boiling water to within 1/2 inch of top. Process both sizes for 90 minutes at pressure for your altitude. Contact your local extension office if you are not sure what pressure to use. HTH! icon_smile.gif

    You can combine the beans or can them separately according to variety. These will make a nice soft ready to use jar for your soups or whatever you use beans for.
    joannelj
    Tue Aug 23, 2011 12:53 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Yes, I read the whole thread, and I see that lots of people do this.

    But I still wonder if any one knows why Presto says not to can dry beans?

    Thanks,
    JoAnne
    Chef on the coast
    Tue Aug 23, 2011 1:57 pm
    Forum Host
    I have a Presto. Some people do use their pressure canners to cook food in. My book also says to not COOK dry beans or oatmeal or any other food that expands while cooking as it would clog the ventilation hole. Processing dry beans in a pressure canner is fine because the beans are expanding inside the jars and not the pressure canner itself.
    joannelj
    Tue Aug 23, 2011 2:10 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Hmm. Mine is a pressure canner, but maybe I was reading the pressure cooker section of the manual. I bet that's it.

    Thanks!
    Kickapoo
    Fri Jan 06, 2012 2:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Molly53 wrote:
    Chef on the coast wrote:
    I do it all the time. Sort through the beans first and get rid of discolored and yucky ones. Be on the lookout for little rocks as well. Rinse. Quart jars need 1 cup dry beans, 1 tsp salt and boiling water to within 1/2 inch of top. Pints need 2/3 cup dry beans, 1/2 tsp salt and boiling water to within 1/2 inch of top. Process both sizes for 90 minutes at pressure for your altitude. Contact your local extension office if you are not sure what pressure to use. HTH! icon_smile.gif

    You can combine the beans or can them separately according to variety. These will make a nice soft ready to use jar for your soups or whatever you use beans for.

    Links:
    Pressure Canning, Part 1
    Pressure Canning, Part 2


    icon_cry.gif The videos are no longer available because the uploader closed their YouTube account. icon_cry.gif
    Molly53
    Fri Jan 06, 2012 5:36 pm
    Forum Host
    That's a bummer! Does anybody else have alternative videos they can recommend?
    herb princess
    Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Does the altitude change the amt of absorbtion of the liquid? Altitude changes EVERYTHING!
    Chef on the coast
    Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:43 pm
    Forum Host
    The only different with the altitude is the pressure at which you can the beans. I've lived at 7,000 ft where I needed to pressure can everything at 15 lb pressure. The beans were for 90 minutes. I am now at sea level where the pressure is 10 lb and I still do the beans for 90 minutes. I have not noticed a difference in absorption of liquid.
    Amberngriffinco
    Fri Jun 01, 2012 2:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    KrisGoodNews wrote:
    Could they make them in fashionable colors? icon_lol.gif You may have a million dollar marketing idea there, Zeldaz!


    of interest I found the other day:


    Brief History of Common Home Canning Jars

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    What are Ball Jars, Kerr Jars, Mason Jars?
    Primitive Canning
    Until 1858, canning jars used a glass jar, a tin flat lid, and sealing wax, which was not reusable and messy!

    Mason Jars
    But in 1858, an inventor and tin smith from New York City, John L. Mason, invented the mason jar. He invented a machine that could cut threads into lids, which made it practical to manufacture a jar with a reusable, screw-on, lid. This was the difference between his design and predecessors, the sealing mechanism: a glass container with a thread molded into its top and a zinc lid with a rubber ring. The rubber created the seal, and the threaded lid maintained it. The jar included his patent: "Mason’s Patent November 30th. 1858."

    The ease of use and affordability of Mason jars helped home canning spread across the nation, not only among farmers, homesteaders and settlers, but also urban families, who began family traditions of canning sauces, pickles, relishes, fruit and tomatoes. Sadly, Mason sold off his rights to the jar to several different people and died a relatively poor man around 1900.

    Clamped Glass-Lid Jars (Lightning Jars)
    In 1882, Henry William Putnam of Bennington, Vermont, invented a fruit jar that used a glass lid and a metal clamp to hold the lid in place. These "Lightning jars" became popular because no metal (which could rust, breaking the seal or contaminating the food) contacted the food and the metal clamps made the lids themselves easier to seal and remove (hence the "Lightning" name) . There were many similar glass lid and wire-clamp jars produced for home canning all the way into the 1960s. Many can still be seen in garage sales, flea markets and on specialty food jars today.

    Atlas Jars
    The Atlas E-Z Seal is a type the Lightning jar. The difference is a raised lip to help keep the jar from cracking. This was called the "Strong Shoulder" and was similar to the mason jar. The cracking was a common problem with shoulder seal jars. Hazel-Atlas Glass Company were in business from the late 1800s until 1964.

    Ball Jars
    Meanwhile, in Buffalo, NY, William Charles Ball and his brothers (Lucius, Lorenzo, Frank C., Edmund Burke, and George Alexander) were in the business of manufacturing wood-jacketed tin cans for the storage of oil, lard and paints. In 1883, the Ball's changed from tin to glass containers and then, in 1886, to glass fruit jars. They moved their operations to Muncie, Indiana, after a fire at their Buffalo factory. Muncie (where a supply of natural gas had been discovered) was chosen because the city was offering free gas and land to rebuild the factory.

    The Balls began acquiring smaller companies, and mass producing and distributing jars across the country. They quickly became the leaders in the industry.

    Kerr Jars
    Alexander H. Kerr founded the Hermetic Fruit Jar Company in 1903 and among the first commercial; products were the Economy and Self Sealing jars. The Economy jars were among the first wide-mouth jars, and thus, were easy to fill. They also incorporated aspects from two 1903 patents held by another inventor, Julius Landsberger: a metal lid with a permanently attached gasket. This made the lids easy to use and inexpensive.

    Mr. Kerr later (1915) invented a smaller, flat metal disk with the same permanent composition gasket. The lid sealed on the top of a mason jar; a threaded metal ring held the lid down during the hot water processing. This allowed re-use of old canning jars together with inexpensive and easy to use disposable lids. The jar we know today was born! This two-part lid system transformed home canning safety and is still in use today.

    Kerr also made the first wide-mouth jars, which Ball was quick to duplicate.

    Today
    The Ball Corporation owned and operated many other plants located in other cities including El Monte, California, Mundelein, Illinois, Asheville, North Carolina. Ball Corporation no longer sells home canning products. Ball spun off that part of their business in 1993 as Alltrista Corporation (which is now Jarden Corp.). Since 1993. the Alltrista Corporation has been manufacturing the Ball glass canning jars. They also make Kerr, Bernardin and Golden Harvest canning jars. Alltrista's home canning product and more information on Ball jars, can be found on their website at homecanning.com.

    And for easy, step-by-step illustrated canning directions, from applesauce to pickles to jams, click here!

    Collecting Old Canning and Fruit Jars
    For inquiries specifically related to old or antique Ball jars, email kvincent@minnetrista.net or write to:

    Minnetrista,
    1200 North Minnetrista Pkwy.,
    Muncie, IN 47303-2925.
    Molly53
    Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:35 pm
    Forum Host
    Amber, did you see this: Collecting American Canning Jars?
    GrowYourOwn
    Mon Jun 04, 2012 6:14 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    I am so trying this out when I get my pressure canner! I love making bean recipes using dried beans and never thought of making them this way!

    icon_biggrin.gif
    Molly53
    Mon Jun 04, 2012 7:33 pm
    Forum Host
    Welcome to our forum, GrowYourOwn! icon_smile.gif
    Amberngriffinco
    Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Molly53 wrote:
    Amber, did you see this: Collecting American Canning Jars?


    no, didn't, but I'll look, thanks!


    Hey, so, Sunday I brought dry pintos to a boil w/some baking soda (was told that cuts the gas) Did it again with clean water Monday, then cooked w/onion, garlic, blk pepper, celery and carrot.

    I kinda got lost, so they were really cooked almost done. Canned using the hot broth (no salt), and filled the beans only 1/2 to 2/3's .. when done after 75 min in the canner, they didn't 'grow' anymore. So, lesson learned, to fill up basically cooked beans more like 3/4's.

    They're perfect to just heat up now and mash for refried!
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