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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Middle East & North Africa / It's Eid el Adha
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    It's Eid el Adha

    Molly53
    Sat Nov 05, 2011 11:31 am
    Forum Host
    This weekend:

    Eid al-Adha in 2011 is on Sunday, the 6th of November.

    Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى‎) "feast of sacrifice" or "Festival of Sacrifice" or "Greater Eid" is an important religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide to commemorate the willingness of Abraham (Ibrahim) to sacrifice his son Ishmael (Isma'il) as an act of obedience to God, before God intervened to provide him with a ram to sacrifice instead.

    Eid al-Adha celebrations start after the Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia by Muslims worldwide, descend from Mount Arafat. The date is approximately 70 days (2 Months & 10 days) after the end of the month of Ramadan, or Eid-ul-Fitr.

    On the first morning of Eid al-Adha, Muslims around the world attend morning prayers at their local mosques. Prayers are followed by visits with family and friends, and the exchange of greetings and gifts. At some point, members of the family will visit a local farm or otherwise will make arrangements for the slaughter of an animal. The meat is distributed during the days of the holiday or shortly thereafter. One-third is eaten by immediate family and relatives, one-third is given away to friends, and one-third is donated to the poor. The act symbolizes a willingness to give up things that are of personal benefit.

    Based on sightability in North America, in 2011 Eid al-Adha will start in North America a day later - on Monday, the 7th of November.

    In the Muslim calender, a holiday begins on the sunset of the previous day, so observing Muslims will celebrate Eid al-Adha on the sunset of Saturday, the 5th of November.

    Although Eid al-Adha is always on the same day of the Islamic calendar, the date on the Gregorian calendar varies from year to year, since the Gregorian calendar is a solar calendar and the Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar. This difference means Eid al-Adha moves in the Gregorian calendar approximately 11 days every year. The date of Eid al-Adha may also vary from country to country depending on whether the moon has been sighted or not.

    The dates provided here are based on the dates adopted by the Fiqh Council of North America for the celebration of Eid al-Adha. Note that these dates are based on astronomical calculations to affirm each date, and not on the actual sighting of the moon with the naked eyes.





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