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    whitestarfish
    Thu Oct 06, 2011 3:24 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baklava

    he history of baklava is not well documented. It has been claimed by many ethnic groups, but there is strong evidence that it is of Central Asian Turkic origin,

    erry assembles evidence to show that layered breads were created by Turkic peoples in Central Asia, and argues that the "missing link" between the Central Asian folded or layered breads (which did not include nuts) and modern phyllo-based pastries like baklava is the Azerbaijani dish Bakı pakhlavası, which involves layers of dough and nuts. The traditional Uzbek pakhlava, puskal or yupka and Tatar yoka, sweet and salty savories (boreks) prepared with 10-12 layers of dough, are other early examples of layered dough style in Turkic regions.[7]



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolma



    Names and etymology
    Preparing dolma

    Dolma is a verbal noun of the Turkish verb dolmak, 'to be stuffed', and means 'stuffed thing'.[1][2]

    Dolma is a stuffed vegetable, that is, a vegetable that is hollowed out and filled with stuffing. This applies to courgette, tomato, pepper, eggplant, and the like; stuffed mackerel, squid, and mussel are also called dolma. Dishes involving wrapping leaves such as vine leaves or cabbage leaves around a filling are called sarma though in many languages, the distinction is usually not made. Sarma is derived from the Turkish verb sarmak which means 'to wrap'. Other variants derive from the Turkish word for 'leaf', yaprak.

    Dolma cooked with olive oil without minced meat is sometimes called yalancı which means 'liar' or 'fake' in Turkish.[3] It is 'fake' because it does not c




    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yo%C4%9Furt


    Source: USDA Nutrient Database
    Cacık, a Turkish cold appetiser yoghurt variety

    Yoghurt, yogurt or yogourt (UK: /ˈjɒɡət/, US: /ˈjoʊɡərt/; Turkish: yoğurt, pronounced [joˈɰuɾt]) is a dairy product produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. The bacteria used to make yoghurt are known as "yoghurt cultures". Fermentation of lactose by these bacteria produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yoghurt its texture and its characteristic tang.


    (also tzakıkı is cacık and turkish as you see)




    tymology and spelling

    The word is derived from Turkish: yoğurt,[1] and is related to the obsolete verb yoğmak 'to be curdled or coagulated; to thicken'.[2] The letter ğ was traditionally rendered as "gh" in transliterations of Turkish. In older Turkish, the letter denoted a voiced velar fricative /ɣ/, but this sound is elided between back vowels in modern Turkish, in which the word is pronounced [joˈuɾt]. Some eastern dialects retain the consonant in this position, and Turks in the Balkans pronounce the word with a hard /ɡ/.[citation needed]
    whitestarfish
    Thu Oct 06, 2011 3:26 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    elmotto may have not found aplace for Turkey in the list of middleeast

    but there are the realities of turkısh cuısıne and if we are in food com,host shouldnt say ''o ıt doesnt matter their sources they are delicious.

    i always like justice..



    baklava dolma yourt is turkish but turkeys place is at the end.......
    whitestarfish
    Thu Oct 06, 2011 3:37 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    dear friends,,pastırma

    dolma cacıkı

    kadayifi

    yourt

    theye are all originally turkish because they have turkısh name

    can aı say cupcake is turkish??

    ist ıt posiible

    also this is that ımpossible
    whitestarfish
    Thu Oct 06, 2011 4:12 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_cuisine

    Culinary customs
    Simit is a circular bread with sesame seeds. Common breakfast item in Turkey.
    [edit] Breakfast
    Yumurtalı ekmek (French toast)

    A typical Turkish breakfast consists of cheese (beyaz peynir, kaşar etc.), butter, olives, eggs, tomatoes, cucumbers, jam, honey, and kaymak. Sucuk (spicy Turkish sausage), pastırma, börek, simit, poğaça and soups are eaten as a morning meal in Turkey. A common Turkish speciality for breakfast is called menemen, which is prepared with tomatoes, green peppers, onion, olive oil and eggs. Invariably, Turkish tea is served at breakfast. The Turkish word for breakfast, kahvaltı, means "before coffee" (kahve, 'coffee'; altı, 'under').


    Homemade food is a must for Turkish people. Although the newly introduced way of life pushes the new generation to eat out, Turkish people generally prefer to eat at home. A typical meal starts with soup (in the winter), followed by a dish made with vegetables or legumes boiled in a pot (typically with meat or minced meat), then rice or bulgur (crushed wheat) pilaf in addition of a salad or cacık (made from diluted yogurt and minced cucumbers).



    arlic.

    Pide, which can be made with minced meat (together with onion, chopped tomatoes, parsley and spices), kashar cheese, spinach, white cheese, pieces of meat, braised meat (kavurma), sucuk, pastırma or/and eggs put on rolled-out dough, is one of the most common traditional stone-baked Turkish specialities.








    ggplant (Turkish: patlıcan) has a special place in the Turkish cuisine. It is combined with minced meat in karnıyarık. As a speciality of eastern Turkey, there are patlıcan kebabs, such as Tokat Kebab, a specialty of Tokat province, and Antep's eggplant kebab. In a large number of mezes, side-dishes, and main courses -such as şakşuka, patlıcan salatası ("eggplant salad", an eggplant purée/dip), patlıcan dolma ("filled eggplant"), hünkâr beğendi (eggplant



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilav



    Pilaf (for an extended list of local names, see Other names) is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth (zirvak).[1] In some cases, the rice may also attain its brown color by being stirred with bits of burned onion, as well as a large mix of spices. The English term pilaf is borrowed directly from Turkish, pilav, w
    whitestarfish
    Thu Oct 06, 2011 4:15 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    as you see, many meals which you think ' greek' are turkısh

    can ı claım that cupcake cookies or hamburger is turkısh

    i would be so mıserable if ı did this...
    Cookgirl
    Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:52 pm
    Forum Host
    I would gladly pay to boldly claim feta is American but
    that would place me on your Forever Naughty List, right?
    Elmotoo
    Mon Oct 10, 2011 9:09 pm
    Forum Host
    thank you for sharing the information. here is the list of countries represented in this forum:

    Morocco
    Egypt
    Libya
    Algeria
    Tunisia

    Iran
    Iraq
    Lebanon
    Syria
    Jordan
    Saudi Arabia
    Palestine
    Kuwait
    Qatar
    United Arab Emirates
    Oman
    Yemen
    Bahrain
    Turkey

    Beth
    Molly53
    Tue Oct 11, 2011 11:17 am
    Forum Host
    whitestarfish wrote:
    as you see, many meals which you think ' greek' are turkısh

    can ı claım that cupcake cookies or hamburger is turkısh

    i would be so mıserable if ı did this...
    Most of the membership is American and generally unfamiliar with Turkish cuisine.

    Perhaps a better term for this style of food would be Eastern Mediterranean, friend. icon_smile.gif

    If I were to plan a birthday feast Turkish-style, what all would I make?
    Elmotoo
    Tue Oct 11, 2011 9:44 pm
    Forum Host
    I don't think at this site we need to worry about the proper origins of anything. We just want to eat good food!! whitestarfish, why don't you submit some authentic Turkish recipes then join us in NA/ME Tag? Also, I could rearrange the countries alphabetically so Turkey is no longer at the end.

    Happy cooking!

    Beth
    JoyfulCook
    Wed Oct 12, 2011 3:17 am
    Forum Host
    Elmotoo wrote:
    I don't think at this site we need to worry about the proper origins of anything. We just want to eat good food!! whitestarfish, why don't you submit some authentic Turkish recipes then join us in NA/ME Tag? Also, I could rearrange the countries alphabetically so Turkey is no longer at the end.

    Happy cooking!

    Beth


    I would love some Turkish recipes, as I love the flavour and aroma of spices.
    whitestarfish
    Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:11 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    nowadays i have been attending the school in another city but if ı find time i will take part.elmotto thanks.what ı mean is that whereas we turks like greeks and fınd similar they try to have everything that we have and you as host of food com should prevent them ffrom acting unfairly..


    Last edited by whitestarfish on Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:13 pm, edited 1 time in total
    whitestarfish
    Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:13 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    molly i lıke your sincerity .if you want a turkısh feast you may make turkısh ravıolı mantı , sarma şiş kebap and bean salad with sesame oil icon_smile.gif
    whitestarfish
    Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:14 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    dear cookgirl you make me disaappointed.ameircans dont claim everytime and own others meals...of course..
    Elmotoo
    Thu Oct 13, 2011 9:55 am
    Forum Host
    whitestarfish wrote:
    nowadays i have been attending the school in another city but if ı find time i will take part.elmotto thanks.what ı mean is that whereas we turks like greeks and fınd similar they try to have everything that we have and you as host of food com should prevent them ffrom acting unfairly..


    "you as host of food com should prevent them ffrom acting unfairly"

    whitestarfish, NO.

    As host of Food.com, I make sure people find the recipes they are looking for. I make sure everybody shows respect for others. I am NOT a border patrol. This is NOT a political site. I do my best to make sure people get their recipes in the proper regional cookbooks as outlined by the regional Forums of this site which comes in really handy when it's time for Zaar World Tour.

    Please participate by offering interesting information about the food you love. Please submit recipes that we can all try. Participate in the many games available, including our own very low key NA/ME Tag which is all about the foods of North Africa & the Middle East.

    I rearranged the list of countries represented in this Forum alphabetically so Turkey is no longer at the end of the list. It was no political statement that it was last. That list was assembled YEARS ago & hadn't even been edited in nearly 4 years!

    If you have any questions or concerns at all or would like to see something added to the NA/ME Forum, feel free to contact me at any time.

    Thank you,
    Beth
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