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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Food Preservation by Freezing & Freezer Organizat
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    Food Preservation by Freezing & Freezer Organizat

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    Molly53
    Tue May 31, 2011 8:07 am
    Forum Host


    Are you tired of not knowing what is buried in your freezer? We'll be discussing some great freezer tips concerning: (1) what to freeze, (2) how to freeze, and (3) how to thaw the foods you freeze in a way that retains the flavor and texture, saves you money, and maximizes your freezer space.

    A freezer can be your best friend if you are aware of how to properly store your food. Freezing is the easiest, most convenient, and least time-consuming method of preserving foods. The holiday seasons have a way of filling the freezer with leftovers. Adding these to the frozen bounty of the past fall's harvest makes for tightly packed freezers.

    There are two types of freezers:
    Chest Freezers – Chest freezers are generally less expensive than uprights and have superior cooling capacity (the cold air doesn't spill out every time you open the door). The downside to chest freezers is accessibility. While newer models come equipped with at least one basket for smaller items, it’s easy for things to get lost in a chest freezer EVEN with really good organization in place.

    Upright Freezers – Upright freezers are a little more expensive and can have a bit less storage capacity, but if you want an easier go at accessibility and maintaining your organization, an upright is your best choice.


    Good freezer management is important. The following tips will help you get the most of your freezer dollar:
    • Place your freezer in a cool, dry area where the temperature is constant.
    • Keep at least 75% full for peak performance. Unlike your refrigerator, your freezer runs more efficiently when it’s tightly packed. That means if your freezer isn’t completely full, you should place something inside the freezer to fill up the empty space.
    • Continue to use and replace foods. Do not simply store them.
    • Open the freezer door as rarely as possible.
    • Make proper use of energy saving features on your freezer.
    • Keep door seals clean and check for proper sealing. Replace when necessary.
    • Defrost manual freezers regularly.
    • Keep the condenser coils clean.

    Freezer Temperature
    Maintain temperature of 0°F/-18C or less to keep frozen foods at top quality. The storage life of foods is shortened as the temperature rises. For example, the same loss of quality in frozen beans stored at 0F for one year will occur in three months at 10F, in three weeks at 20F, and in five days at 30F.

    Fluctuating temperatures result in growth in the size of ice crystals, further damaging cells and creating a mushier product. Changes in temperature can also cause water to migrate from the product (freezer burn). WHAT IS FREEZER BURN AND HOW TO PREVENT IT (link)

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    Freezing to fend off food spoilage
    Food spoilage is caused by microorganisms, chemicals, and enzymes. Freezing foods to 0 degrees F. is recommended for best quality.

    Freezing stops the growth of microorganisms; however, it does not sterilize foods or destroy the organisms that cause spoilage. A few organisms may die, but once thawed to warmer temperatures, these organisms can return to life and quickly multiply.

    Chemical changes affect quality or cause spoilage in frozen foods. One major chemical reaction is oxidation. If air is left in contact with the frozen food oxidation will occur even in the freezer. An example is the oxidation of fats, also called rancidity.

    Enzymes are naturally present in foods and their activity can lead to the deterioration of food quality. Enzymes present in animal foods, vegetables and fruit promote chemical reactions, such as ripening. Freezing only slows the enzyme activity that takes place in foods. It does not halt these reactions which continue after harvesting. Enzyme activity does not harm frozen meats or fish, but browning can occur in fruits while they are being frozen or thawed.

    Blanching
    Blanching vegetables before freezing inactivates the enzymes. During blanching, the vegetable is exposed to boiling water or steam for a brief period. The vegetable is then rapidly cooled in ice water to prevent cooking. Following the recommended times for blanching each vegetable is important. Over-blanching results in a cooked product and loss of flavor, color, and nutrients. Under-blanching stimulates enzyme activity and is worse than no blanching at all. See: HOW TO BLANCH FOR FREEZING (link)

    Chemical Treatment of Fruits
    Fruits may also be steamed or cooked before freezing, but are more commonly treated with ascorbic acid to inactivate enzymes responsible for browning. See freezing recommendations for individual foods for specific recommended ascorbic acid usage: HOW TO FREEZE (link) and HOW TO FREEZE FRUIT (link) for more information.

    Supplies will need to organize your freezer:
    • airtight freezer containers
    • zip lock freezer bags
    • aluminum foil or plastic wrap, vapor-resistant wrapping (i.e. butcher paper)
    • labels or tape and marker for labeling
    • empty bins & garbage bags for compartmentalizing
    • extra larger plastic boxes or stackable freezer baskets to define spaces

    Packing and Packaging
    Packing methods include dry packs, syrup packs, sugar packs, or possibly crushed or cooked packs. Each has advantages and disadvantages. Pectin or artificial sweeteners are offered as options for specific fruits. See freezing recommendations for individual foods for specific recommended packs: HOW TO FREEZE (link)

    Packaging Materials
    The prime purpose of packaging is to keep food from drying out and to preserve nutritive value, flavor, texture and color. Labels on packages will say if the product is suitable for freezer storage. A good packaging material should have the following characteristics:
    • Moisture/vapor-proof or at least moisture resistant.
    • Made of food grade material, i.e. designed to be used for food products.
    • Durable and leakproof.
    • Doesn't become brittle and crack at low temperatures.
    • Resistant to oil, grease or water.
    • Protect foods from off flavors and odors.
    • Easy to fill and seal.
    • Easy to mark and store.
    The packaging you select will depend on the type of food to be frozen, personal preference and availability. For satisfactory results, do not freeze fruits and vegetables in containers larger than one-half gallon.

    Packaging not sufficiently moisture/vapor-resistant for long-time freezer storage includes ordinary waxed paper and paper cartons from ice cream and milk.

    Good packaging will help prevent air from entering the container and moisture loss. Severe moisture loss, or ice crystals evaporating from the surface of a product, produces freezer burn -- a grainy, brownish or white surface where the tissues have become dry and tough. Freezer-burned food is likely to develop off flavors, but it will not cause illness. Packaging in air-tight rigid containers or heavyweight, moisture-resistant wrap will prevent freezer burn.

    Rigid Containers
    Rigid containers are made of plastic, glass, aluminum and heavily waxed cardboard and are suitable for all packs. These are often reusable. Straight or tapered sides on rigid containers make it much easier to remove frozen foods.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Glass jars used for freezing should be made for the purpose. Regular glass jars may not withstand the extremes in temperature. Do not use regular, narrow-mouth canning jars for freezing foods packed in liquid. Expansion of the liquid could cause the jar to break at the neck.

    Cans, such as shortening and coffee cans, are good for packaging delicate foods. Line the can with a food-storage bag and seal the lid with freezer tape because they are not airtight.

    Baking dishes can be used for freezing, heating and serving. Dishes may be covered with a heavy aluminum foil taped with freezer tape. To reuse the baking dish after the food is frozen, wrap the food in casserole-wrap fashion.

    Ice cube trays are good for freezing foods in small amounts. Freeze food until firm and then transfer cubes to freezer bags.

    METHODS OF WRAPPING



    Properly frozen foods maintain more of their original color, flavor and texture and generally more of their nutrients than foods preserved by other methods.
    LIST OF FOODS AND FREEZING INSTRUCTIONS (link)
    FOODS THAT DON'T FREEZE WELL (link)
    20 Freezing Quick Tips: Timeless Wisdom Collection From The Fifties (link)

    Freezing Pointers
    • Freeze foods at 0°F/-18C or lower. To facilitate more rapid freezing, set the temperature control at -10°F or lower about 24 hours in advance.
    • Freeze foods as soon as they are packed and sealed.
    • Do not overload your freezer with unfrozen food. Add only the amount that will freeze within 24 hours, which is usually 2 to 3 pounds of food per cubic foot of storage space. Overloading slows down the freezing rate, and foods that freeze too slowly may lose quality.
    • Place packages in contact with refrigerated surfaces in the coldest part of the freezer.
    • Leave a little space between packages so air can circulate freely. then, when the food is frozen, store the packages close together.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Textural changes during freezing
    Freezing actually consists of freezing the water contained in the food. When the water freezes, it expands and the ice crystals formed can cause the cell walls of the food to rupture. Consequently the texture of the product will be much softer when the product thaws. Getting a food to a frozen state quickly helps keep the size of the ice crystals small. Less damage to cell walls of foods will occur and the final texture will be better. Keeping food frozen at 0 degrees F or lower will also minimize ice crystal growth that results when food temperatures fluctuate (i.e., warm up and re-freeze) too much while in the freezer.

    Safe Defrosting
    Never defrost foods on the kitchen counter, in a garage, basement, car, dishwasher or outdoors. These methods can leave your foods unsafe to eat. There are three safe ways to defrost food: in the refrigerator at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower, in the microwave immediately before cooking, or in running cold water for very short periods of time. Foods thawed in the microwave or by the running cold water method should be cooked thoroughly immediately after thawing occurs. THAWING AND PREPARING FOODS FOR SERVING (link)

    What If the Freezer Stops?
    The basis for safety in refreezing foods is the temperature at which thawed foods have been held and the length of time they were held after thawing. You can safely refreeze foods that still contain ice crystals or if they are still cold, i.e. below 40 F, and have been held no longer than one or two days at this temperature after thawing. In general, if it is safe to eat it is safe to refreeze.

    Unfortunately, you often don't know the time and temperature. In these cases, you need to consider the following points.
    Do not open the door to check items; make a plan first.
    • Try to determine, if possible, when the freezer may have stopped working.
    • Food in a closed, fully loaded freezer will keep for two days.
    • Food in a closed less than half loaded freezer won't keep longer than one day.
    • Meat, because of density, will remain frozen longer than baked goods.
    • Foods in a larger, well-stocked freezer, will stay frozen longer.
    If the freezer will not be operational within a day or two:
    • Use dry ice if available. Twenty-five pounds of dry ice in a 10 cubic foot freezer should hold the temperature below freezing for two to three days with less than half a load and three to four days in a fully loaded cabinet if you obtain dry ice quickly following interruption of freezer operation.
    • Place dry ice on boards or heavy cardboard on top of packages. Open freezer only when necessary. Don't handle dry ice with bare hands as it will cause burns.
    When using dry ice be sure the room is ventilated. If dry ice is not available, other options are to:
    • Cover the freezer with layers of newspaper and blankets. Pin the blankets away from the air vent. The air vent must be open because the freezer needs air when electricity comes on. A blanket cover will help even when using dry ice.
    • Find other freezer storage at a locker plant or with friends and neighbors. Transfer foods in insulated boxes or well-wrapped in layers of newspapers.

    What to Refreeze
    • Foods that have defrosted have no remaining ice crystals. If defrosted foods have warmed above refrigerator temperature (40 F) they should not be refrozen, except for very high acid foods, such as fruits.
    • Many thawed foods, i.e. those still containing many ice crystals or a firm-to-hard core of ice in the center, may be safely refrozen.
    • Any signs of spoilage, off-odors or color in any food indicate you should dispose of the food without tasting. Remember, however, that you can't rely on appearance and odor. Some foods may look and smell fine, but if they've been at room temperature too long, food poisoning bacteria may have multiplied enough to cause illness.
    • Meats, such as beef, pork, veal, lamb and poultry can be refrozen when they are still firm with ice crystals. Meat still safe to eat can be cooked and refrozen. Discard meats if they have any signs of spoilage such as an off-color or off-odor.
    • Fruits usually ferment when they start to spoil, which will not make them dangerous to eat but will spoil the flavor. Defrosted fruits that smell and taste good can be refrozen.
    • Vegetables should be refrozen only if they contain plenty of ice crystals.
    • Shellfish, prepared foods or leftovers should not be refrozen if defrosted. If the condition of the food is poor or even questionable, get rid of it. It may be dangerous.
    • Never refreeze melted ice cream, cream pies, eclairs or similar foods.
    • Unfrosted cakes, uncooked fruit pies, breads and rolls can be refrozen.
    The investment in the foods in the freezer may be significant, but so are the benefits of serving safe foods.

    Refreezing
    If food is thawed in the refrigerator, it is safe to refreeze it without cooking, although there will usually be a noticeable loss of quality due to the moisture lost through defrosting.
    After cooking raw foods that were previously frozen, it is safe to freeze the cooked foods if safe cooking procedures were followed.
    If previously cooked foods are thawed in the refrigerator, you may refreeze the unused portion. Again, there will be some quality loss from the additional freezing and thawing.
    If you purchase previously frozen meat, poultry or fish at a retail store, you can refreeze if it has been handled and transported properly, observing time limits for the Temperature Danger Zone. (Do not keep perishable foods between 40 and 140 degrees F for more than 2 hours; limit time to 1 hour in very warm temperatures. Any times in the TDZ are combined to determine this limit.)
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    Foods thawed in the microwave or by the running cold water method should be cooked before refreezing.

    Using and Cooking Frozen Foods
    Frozen fruits are often eaten without cooking. Many are best if eaten while they still contain a few ice crystals. Vegetables may be cooked after thawing or while still frozen. Raw or cooked meat, poultry or casseroles can be cooked or reheated from the frozen state. However, it will take approximately one and a half times the usual cooking time for food that has been thawed. Always cook foods to the recommended internal temperature using a food thermometer.

    Freezer Management
    A full freezer is most energy efficient, and refilling your freezer several times a year is most cost efficient. If the freezer is filled and emptied only once each year, the energy cost per package is very high. You can lower the cost for each pound of stored food by filling and emptying your freezer two, three and even more times each year.

    Post a frozen foods inventory near the freezer and keep it up to date by listing the foods and dates of freezing as you put them in the freezer. Check them off as you take them out. By keeping an inventory, you will know the exact amounts and kinds of foods in the freezer at all times. It also helps to keep foods from being forgotten.

    Organize the food in the freezer into food groups for ease in locating (i.e. all meat together, all vegetables together, etc.). Arrange packages so that those which have been in the freezer the longest are the first ones used.

    FREEZER INVENTORY WORKSHEET (link)

    Pick A Date
    Pick a date once a month or more often when you are regularly going to complete your Freezer Inventory Worksheet. This will help with consistency.

    Take Inventory
    Print off the Freezer Inventory Worksheet or save it as a new copy for yourself. Go to your freezer and take stock of what you have on hand.

    Highlight “Need to Use Items”
    Foods only have a certain shelf life in a freezer. As you note the dates on this worksheet, also look at dates as you are updating your inventory worksheet. If there are items that are getting near the end of their “life” highlight them so you incorporate them soon into your menu. No use letting that hard work go to waste.

    Put List On Freezer
    You'll want to make sure that your freezer list gets updated as you consume and purchase new items. Use a magnetic flat picture frame or tape list to the freezer door and cross off items as they are used, or indicate what items which have been used in the “Items Used” column. Keep a pencil near the list.

    Tips For Easy Freezer Inventory Management
    1. Create clear categories for freezer organization - To begin, set up a banquet table and/or clear your horizontal counter space. Next, recoup your freezer space by clearing out the entire freezer. Place your items on the table and counter tops. Categorize as you go by placing like items together. This will help you see what you have and make finding what you need a snap. Some possible categories include:
    • Meats
    • Fruits & Veggies
    • Jams
    • Ready meals
    • Desserts
    • Breads
    • Sauces
    2. Determine freezer placement and storage options with freezer organization zones – Some tips for best category placement include:
    • Store meats in the coldest section (toward the bottom or at the back)
    • Store most used items at eye level.
    • Store items that can be less cold in the door (ice cream, juice, butter, nuts, etc.)
    3. Use internal containing for freezer organization - Containers can save you time and money by keeping like items together within your zones. When you select containers for your freezer:
    • Opt for clear containers
    • Use heavy duty containers that are freezer-safe or freezer-specific.
    • Look for straight-sided containers with an airtight seal. These will help you maximize freezer organization space.
    • Use tiered shelves (like the white plastic-coated wire shelves at Wal-Mart and Target) for casserole dishes, pizzas, etc.
    • Pre-portion items bought in bulk so you can more easily contain and store them.
    4. Label! – Labeling your containers will help keep your established zones in place. You can use labels (either purchased or printed out on your computer) or heavy duty labeling tape. Label food with the item name and date frozen. If you're freezing prepared things like casseroles, you'll want to label with date, cooking time and temperature. Example: Lasagna, 5/20/11, 350F, 1.5 hours.



    FREEZER RECIPES (link)

    RECIPES USING FROZEN FOODS (link)

    Please feel free to share a photo of your own organized freezer, or add a comment, tip or suggestion for organization! icon_smile.gif

    Los recursos en Espanol:
    Congelación de Frutas y Hortalizas, Universidad de Texas A&M

    Books you may be interested in:

    "How to Freeze: Everything You Need to Know About Freezing" by Carolyn Humphries


    "Will It Freeze?" by Joan Hood


    "Preserving Summer's Bounty: A Quick And Easy Guide To Freezing, Canning, Preserving, And Drying What You Grow" by Rodale Food Center and Susan McClure


    "The Freezer Cooking Manual from 30 Day Gourmet: A Month of Meals Made Easy"


    "Don't Panic - Dinner's in the Freezer: Great-Tasting Meals You Can Make Ahead"


    Last edited by Molly53 on Sat Mar 16, 2013 4:45 pm, edited 3 times in total
    ZenLineDancer
    Tue May 31, 2011 7:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Freezer tips from one who relies on home grown foods!

    If the power goes out in the winter: in our area it freezes every night so I could freeze trays of water outdoors to place on and in the freezers during the day.

    I always lay a piece of rigid foam foil sided insulation loose on the top of my chest freezer to add to the cold conservation. This did not work on the sides of my upright as it is trying to dispurse heat here - so check your freezer for heat on any side before you add more insulation. This is easy and no hassle when getting into the freezer.

    If you have more than one freezer, prioritize them. I place low priority level freezings in one - coffee, brown rice, dry cat food, and other things that keep longer if frozen but won't go bad if the power goes out. Then I can concentrate on keeping the high priority freezers going if the power goes out with the extra insulating blankets and ratty comforters bought at thrift stores and garage sales for this purpose.

    Use cardboard boxes, labeled for like items. This works on shelves or in a chest type. Then you can manuver the boxes around to get to what is under them. You can also check easily to see how full a box is to know how the inventory on that item is going. In spring time you can see easily what you need to plant more of this year and less of based on quantities still available (for me broccoli was long gone and sweet corn still OK).
    mums the word
    Sat Jun 04, 2011 9:50 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Wow Molly, thanks for posting this. I am saving it to my "favourite topics" so I can read through it all. What a wealth of info. icon_smile.gif

    One thing I have trouble with is freezing bread/muffins. I find that after a few weeks (2-3) the items just don't taste the same. I use freezer ziplocs and squish all the air out, but still find it loses the original flavour. Hopefully, I will learn something in this great post of yours.

    Also, the pic of the beautifully stocked freezer with its flat packages has inspired me. My freezer looks like a bomb went off most of the time, as it is a chest freezer and I have to continually move baskets around to get to what I want.
    dianegrapegrower
    Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:07 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I have a small chest freezer, and find that you do have to be organized. My freezer can hold 4 milk crates (2 side by side on the bottom, 2 more stacked on top) I have them in different colors: red is for meat, yellow for poultry, blue for fish, and green for veggies. So I can find items relatively easily. I also keep an inventory of what's in the freezer on an excel spreadsheet, so I don't have to rummage around to see what's there.

    Diane


    Last edited by dianegrapegrower on Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:17 am, edited 1 time in total
    Molly53
    Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:14 am
    Forum Host
    The color-coded baskets is a terrific idea, Diane. Thanks for sharing. icon_smile.gif
    Cinisajoy
    Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Molly,
    If you have an e-reader that reads PDF's you can make a Google Doc Spreadsheet for your freezer inventory, download it as a PDF and put it on your e-reader. Now my e-reader has a memory card slot so I just send to a memory card and put it in the e-reader. I personally have a folder called Grocery Inventory which has all my groceries stored in PDF's.

    It works great because I can look at the list at the store and say either yes that is a great deal or no we have plenty at the moment.

    I try to update the inventory at least twice a week. We usually need milk twice a week.
    mums the word
    Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:59 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I use colour coded baskets too and it works well, but they sure are heavy to move around. I'd really like a stand up freezer in my next life. icon_wink.gif

    I also keep an inventory list and cross off items as I use them. I know everything that is in the freezer and waste nothing. My mother-in -law
    has her freezers filled to the hilt and hasn't got a clue how old the stuff is near the bottom. Ewww. That would bug me.
    Molly53
    Sun Jun 05, 2011 9:18 pm
    Forum Host
    Cinisajoy wrote:
    Molly,
    If you have an e-reader that reads PDF's you can make a Google Doc Spreadsheet for your freezer inventory, download it as a PDF and put it on your e-reader. Now my e-reader has a memory card slot so I just send to a memory card and put it in the e-reader. I personally have a folder called Grocery Inventory which has all my groceries stored in PDF's.

    It works great because I can look at the list at the store and say either yes that is a great deal or no we have plenty at the moment.

    I try to update the inventory at least twice a week. We usually need milk twice a week.
    Great tip, CJ! Long time, no see! wave.gif
    Cinisajoy
    Sun Jun 05, 2011 9:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi! I discovered it a few weeks ago after we totally reorganized the kitchen and had to throw out too much. I decided I wanted a permanent grocery list. I couldn't find one that fit us so I decided to use google docs. The easy part was creating the spreadsheet. The hard part was inputting everything.

    Oh I have one made just for sharing if anyone would like it. All I need is an e-mail address. Anyone that wants it can pm me.
    Chef1MOM~Connie
    Tue Sep 13, 2011 3:32 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I cannot begin to THANK Molly for her extensive research, time, and patience in puttin this page together for us.
    I asked her if we had a specific forum for chatting in and we do not. This seemed like the BEST place to begin.

    As most of us are getting into the fall season, cleaning out gardens, geting home grown produce from our stores and farmer's markets, and purchasing our stock for the winters I wanted to ask some questions ofall you chefs.

    I have 3 freezers.
    1 is a huge stand up 27 cu ft.
    1 is a 7.2 cu ft deep chest
    1 is the other half of my side by side fridge.

    I am fairly good at packing them away, organizing, and using what I have.
    I learned from another chef here to write down everything in the freezersto keep a stcok list for use and for replenishment. It works great for a while then I get lazyor hubby grabs abd goes and I have no ide where that meat went to. icon_smile.gif icon_eek.gif

    Eitherway I am popping this forum back to the top as it seems like it is a great time to share ideas, recipes, mitakes, or ask questions that Molly has not already provided us.
    Thanks
    Connie
    Chef1MOM~Connie
    Tue Sep 13, 2011 3:35 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Cinisajoy wrote:
    Hi! I discovered it a few weeks ago after we totally reorganized the kitchen and had to throw out too much. I decided I wanted a permanent grocery list. I couldn't find one that fit us so I decided to use google docs. The easy part was creating the spreadsheet. The hard part was inputting everything.

    Oh I have one made just for sharing if anyone would like it. All I need is an e-mail address. Anyone that wants it can pm me.


    I WOULD LOVE ONE!!!!

    cmcqb at hotmail dot com
    Molly53
    Tue Sep 13, 2011 3:51 pm
    Forum Host
    Chef1MOM~Connie wrote:
    I cannot begin to THANK Molly for her extensive research, time, and patience in puttin this page together for us.
    I asked her if we had a specific forum for chatting in and we do not. This seemed like the BEST place to begin.

    As most of us are getting into the fall season, cleaning out gardens, geting home grown produce from our stores and farmer's markets, and purchasing our stock for the winters I wanted to ask some questions ofall you chefs.

    I have 3 freezers.
    1 is a huge stand up 27 cu ft.
    1 is a 7.2 cu ft deep chest
    1 is the other half of my side by side fridge.

    I am fairly good at packing them away, organizing, and using what I have.
    I learned from another chef here to write down everything in the freezersto keep a stcok list for use and for replenishment. It works great for a while then I get lazyor hubby grabs abd goes and I have no ide where that meat went to. icon_smile.gif icon_eek.gif

    Eitherway I am popping this forum back to the top as it seems like it is a great time to share ideas, recipes, mitakes, or ask questions that Molly has not already provided us.
    Thanks
    Connie
    It seems to me that one freezer might be for meats and prepared foods, the other for vegetables and fruits and the side by side freezer for things you want to make this week.

    Did you see this link: FREEZER INVENTORY WORKSHEET?

    I wonder if a dry erase board near your freezers wouldn't be a helpful tool for hubby to mark off what he took out?
    tasb
    Tue Sep 13, 2011 11:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    WOW, how did I miss this one. I do a lot of freezing in the summer months. As my garden puts out veggies and I am buying up fruit left-right-and- center. icon_lol.gif I have 2 chest freezers (7 cu ft) and the freezer on the frig too. I use plastic shoe containers for bulk storage of fruits and veggies, a couple eggo waffle boxes for holding un-baked pies or odds and ends.

    Nothing is official at where it belongs, but one usually has the containers, meat, the pies, bagged veggies and fruits.

    The other one has frozen meals, bread, boxes of burgers, cooked diced chicken, and corn on the cob.
    Molly53
    Wed Sep 14, 2011 12:23 pm
    Forum Host
    tasb wrote:
    WOW, how did I miss this one. I do a lot of freezing in the summer months.
    Did you see the TOTM for this month, friend?

    FYI, we archive all of the TOTMs in the Welcome thread stuck to the top of this forum's topics list. Scroll down towards the bottom of the thread for easy reference.
    tasb
    Thu Sep 15, 2011 1:25 am
    Food.com Groupie
    yeah I check out the TOTM every month, maybe I am just brain-dead, icon_lol.gif icon_wink.gif , but it has so much information. Thanks for bringing it here for us to read over again.

    I forgot I wanted to add some pics of the plastic containers I use for my bulk storage. These containers I picked up at Costco a few years ago, but they no longer sell them, I did pick up some Sterlite ones from Walmart, and really not happy with how flimsy the plastic is on them, but I had peeled off all the stickers and threw them into the garbage, same with the receipt, so I am kind of stuck with them, I should have picked up the Rubbermaid ones instead. Also a not so great picture of the foil pans I use for casseroles. These ones are filled with lasagna and pasta sauce. They have to be stack cross-wise until frozen or they just fall into each other and the filling squishes out and makes a mess, after they are frozen then you and face them all the same way. These I pick up at a restaurant supply store for about $28 for 50 pans and lids. I was paying $6 for 5 at the grocery store. They also have a smaller one 4 1/4 x 5" pan that single people I work with love when I fill those with leftovers for them to take home.

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