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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Kitchen Information Reference Forum / Fine grated cheese - cups to grams?
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    Fine grated cheese - cups to grams?

    FranOnTheEdge
    Wed Apr 27, 2011 11:31 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Hi, I have a recipe for spicy cheese bread - the bread is in the automatic breadmaker right now, I just put it in.
    Now I need to add 3/4 of a cup of fine grated cheese in 45 to 72 minutes....

    Help???

    I tried grating the cheese on my grater's finest side, and putting it into my cup measure..... only there's one heck of a lot of air in there with it...

    I then tried weighing it - using a different recipe from a totally different cookbook to compare grams (both for panasonic breadmaker, but one's from New Zealand and the other's a UK one) - this UK one says 75g of cheese to 500g BROWN flour, but all the other ingredients are also very slightly different - even the dratted yeast - but I found out about that.

    (I'm using 450g WHITE flour)

    The book with the cup of cheese doesn't even offer you grams at all... So I've no idea if I should cram the cheese down hard into the cup to make 75 g of cheese fit, or if I should use just 20 g of cheese - which is what you get if you just let the grated cheese fall gently into the cup...

    Cups to grams online conversion says 3/4 cup of butter is 177g so what's grated cheese???


    Last edited by FranOnTheEdge on Thu Apr 28, 2011 6:20 pm, edited 1 time in total
    Shirl (J) 831
    Thu Apr 28, 2011 9:29 am
    Forum Host
    when ever I add grated cheese to anything I pat it down some not packed down super tight but pat it down to the 3/4 cup it will be fine icon_smile.gif
    FranOnTheEdge
    Thu Apr 28, 2011 10:43 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Considering how the fat content affects the rise, is there any way to find out exactly what weight in grams of cheddar cheese, 3/4 of a cup is actually meant to be?

    I mean the conversion rate weight for butter is 177g to 3/4 of a cup, but I was scared to put that much cheese in yesterday and I only put in 85g.
    The bread rose very well indeed, and tasted fine, but obviously if it should have been 177g that's more than double what I ended up putting in.
    and the PUK kitchen said "you can add 125g or bits in the dispenser (I don't have a dsipenser so I add extras like that on raisin beep) but if you add more than 125g it MAY impair the rise."

    In the cheese and bacon recipe they allow 75g of cheese and 75g of bacon bits - both of which will be fatty.

    and in a black olive and red onion recipe you leave out butter altogether, fry the onion then dry it a bit on kitchen paper and add 100g of black olives.

    Yet with the cheese and onion bread they say 75g cheddar cheese, 1/2 to 1 onion diced, fried and dried, and if that rises okay add 50g of parmesan... which gives 125g of cheese total plus the fatty fried onion..... (but no butter in that one either)

    Yet I already tried 85g cheddar and it was fine. (and that was with the 2 Tbsn butter still in the recipe.)

    It's very confusing.....
    Zurie
    Thu Apr 28, 2011 11:23 am
    Forum Host
    Wow, it IS confusing. We're metric, but it's just about impossible to know the weight of the different cheeses, grated, unless you do it one by one!

    I mean, cheddar will have a different weight for a 3/4 cup to pecorino or Parmesan ...

    If in doubt about the fat content and the way it'll affect the rising, rather use a mature, dry cheese like either aged pecorino or real parmesan -- the fat and moisture content are lower. Must say, 75 g sounds right to me. (177 g, as for butter, sounds like far too much).

    White flour will also give you a better rise with these additions than brown (bread) flour.
    FranOnTheEdge
    Thu Apr 28, 2011 6:34 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Zurie wrote:
    Wow, it IS confusing. We're metric, but it's just about impossible to know the weight of the different cheeses, grated, unless you do it one by one!

    I mean, cheddar will have a different weight for a 3/4 cup to pecorino or Parmesan ...


    Exactly, and I always used to 1st weigh the cheese and then grate it afterwards, when following normal recipes in all my normal cookery books (which are almost exclusively imperial measures) - the logical way to do it...

    Zurie wrote:
    If in doubt about the fat content and the way it'll affect the rising, rather use a mature, dry cheese like either aged pecorino or real parmesan -- the fat and moisture content are lower.


    Yes.... if it was just me I would, but I have a handicap, it's called a husband, and he's not at all fond of parmesan or similar such cheeses, he calls it pongy cheese, or mouldy foot cheese, and says it honks. What can you do with someone like that? Lol!

    ..... I might try it without telling him, see what happens... ROFL!

    Zurie wrote:
    Must say, 75 g sounds right to me. (177 g, as for butter, sounds like far too much).

    White flour will also give you a better rise with these additions than brown (bread) flour.


    Thank goodness I had a bag of white then, what with using 85g of cheddar cheese and the 2 Tbsp of butter as well If I hadn't had the white, I'd have had to use brown...., & it would probably have flumped badly.

    I think the PUK kitchen also said that using Brown flour needed longer rising.... or implied that...
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