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    what is lemon aroma

    leburtski
    Fri Sep 04, 2009 3:35 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    hello, can someone please help me? my wife wants me to make her a cheesecake using a recipe from from one of her slutty romance novels, and one of the ingredients is unfamiliar to me. the recipe calls for a half glass of lemon aroma, and i've never heard of it before.
    I've done some preliminary research on the web and came up with a couple of answers, but nothing exact. my initial thought is that its either a liqueur or a fruit beer of some kind, but without a solid answer, i'm somewhat at a loss. the recipe author is from germany, if that helps. i know that common ingredients change names across regions as wll as countries, but this is one i've never come across before. any help would be greatly appreciated. many thanks, the Big Leburtski
    Mia in Germany
    Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:20 pm
    Forum Host
    Hi,

    I'm German and what I know to be the most common lemon arome we use is this:

    www.oetker.us/en/product/baking-aids/flavorings/lemon-flavoring

    It's the popular lemon arome in Germany, but actually you'd never need a half glass of it but maybe half of one of those small vials. One vial is for 1 lb flour.

    Good luck icon_biggrin.gif

    Mia[/i]
    Tea Girl
    Sat Sep 05, 2009 3:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I agree with Mia, the only thing I know called like that is lemon flavouring and would assume it means half of one of those little vials because it is usually very powerful. Even that seems a bit much to me. I have never used more than a few drops of it in something, but some of the recipes I found with a quick Google search I would think that is about right. I am not a fan of Käsekuchen so I am just going on what other recipes I could find.
    Taylor in Belgium
    Mon Sep 07, 2009 6:00 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I did the Dutch search and found that it is used in Morokkan recipes quite often. 1vial or 2ml is enough for 2cups(16oz) of liquid. I'm guessing from the sounds of the 1/2 glass ingredient that it can be mixed with the liquid in the recipe...so..use only 1/2 to 1/4 of the little vial!!
    http://www.oetker.be/oetker_be/html/default/debi-5dnkt5.nl.html

    I like those recipes found in the "slutty"romance novels..got one one time from New Orleans for red beans and rice..yummy!!
    sugar maple
    Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:46 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    I'd use about a teaspoon of freshly grated lemon rind myself, the German lemon extract stuff is very artificial-tasting, I find.
    Mia in Germany
    Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:20 am
    Forum Host
    sugar maple wrote:
    I'd use about a teaspoon of freshly grated lemon rind myself, the German lemon extract stuff is very artificial-tasting, I find.


    There you are right icon_biggrin.gif I'd never use it, actually.
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