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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Shortening
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    Shortening

    Tizzy
    Tue Mar 12, 2002 10:46 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Please - when a recipe asks for 'shortening', what is shortening?
    Can you give the equivalent for English recipes.
    Dib's
    Tue Mar 12, 2002 10:50 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Shortening is a solid vegetable oil, sold in a tub or brick, like Lard is solid fat. Di
    1Steve
    Tue Mar 12, 2002 11:30 am
    Food.com Groupie
    In the US the most popular brand is Crisco. In the UK I believe the Equivalent is called Trex.
    Sackville
    Wed Mar 13, 2002 3:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I don't know how other people have fared, but I've always found that substituting butter for shortening or lard works just fine -- after all, it's all just fat.
    Tracy K
    Wed Mar 13, 2002 4:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Quote:

    I don't know how other people have fared, but I've always found that substituting butter for shortening or lard works just fine -- after all, it's all just fat.


    Actually, Friedel, that's only partially true. Besides the obvious flavor difference, the kind of fat you use affects your finished product in different ways.

    For example, in cookies (advice from Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise):

    Butter makes cookies spread more.

    Butter melts immediately in a hot oven, so cookies made with butter will spread. Also, butter is only about 80% fat, with about 18% water, which contributes to spread. Shortening, on the other hand, melts at a higher temperature, so cookies have more time to set in the oven and will stay domed.

    The fat you use makes a small difference in how brown your cookies will be. Since protein promotes browning, cookies made with shortening (which has no protein) will be slightly less brown than those made with butter (which has a little protein).
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