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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Grilling / BBQ / Smoking / Can YOU grill Prime Rib?
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    Can YOU grill Prime Rib?

    Rita~
    Tue Mar 25, 2008 7:25 pm
    Forum Host
    **************************** "National Prime Rib Day April"

    YUMMY
    ***************
    Can you believe the zaar has only 9 prime rib recipes that are cooked out doors?

    Prime rib recipes

    Crusty Garlic Spiced Prime Rib
    Smoked Prime Rib
    Grilled Prime Rib Bones With Deviled Mustard-Horseradish Sauce
    Whiskey Smoked Prime Rib
    Prime Rib With Texas Dry Rub
    Deep Fried Prime Rib
    Prime Rib With Garlic and Blue Cheese Dressing
    Barbecued Prime Rib Bones
    Herb-Crusted Prime Rib With Red Wine Sauce

    PrimeThe secret of grilling prime rib is to keep the temperature low enough during cooking and to remove it from the grill when done.
    Grill indirectly and use a drip pan to catch the drippings.
    Do add water, wine, juice or beer to the pan to keep the drippings from burning away if you want to make gravy.
    Know the weight of your prime rib.
    Grill indirectly for 12 to 14 minutes per pound.
    Prepare the roast with seasonings of choice.
    Oil Grates of grill.
    Place the roast on the grill directly over the dripping pan.
    An 18 pound roast will take about 3 1/2 to 4 hours.
    Important to use an accurate meat thermometer to check for doneness.
    You DON`T want to over cook this roast.
    When the meat reaches an internal temperature of 115 to 125 degrees remove it from the grill.
    Place it on a platter (On a bed of fresh herbs is really aromatic) and cover loosely with foil.
    The meat will continue cooking and the internal temperature will continue to rise.
    Let rest for 15-30 minutes, but no more than 30. If you want the roast rare to medium rare, remove from the grill when the temperature is 115 degrees and let it rest for 15 minutes.
    If you want it more well done, remove from the grill at 125 degrees and let it rest for 30 minutes.

    OK! Now do you all have it?
    Take these directions and post your recipes using my guidelines.
    WE would love to see what seasonings you come up with.
    post your recipes and Photos here.......


    Last edited by Rita~ on Fri May 16, 2008 11:11 am, edited 1 time in total
    John DOH
    Tue Mar 25, 2008 11:03 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Rita, Rita, you make a wonderful post, but consider that there are only 3 of us here to eat such a roast, and 18 lbs is a bit "much" under those circumstances!

    At best, we might get 6 eaters, and out at the cottage, as many as 8 or even 10!

    I guess I like mine a bit more "well done" but can seriously recommend "Daddy Hinkles" liquid marinade and rub; likwise, peeling the membrane from the rib bones to soak the extra flavours in.

    Herbs are a great improvement; using the "lardooning" technique (poking a hole into the meat with a boning knife, inserting a sliver of fresh garlic, onion, rosemary "pins" as opposed "stems") and such can really add to the results.

    You'll never get any big ton of recipe suggestions for this roast, just a bunch of incidental "tips" on what "works", as Prime or Standing Rib Roasts are hard to screw up.

    Mind, if I had my "druthers" I'd do it on a rotisserie, but I'm a Canuck, and maybe we do things "differently" from our southern neighbours...

    John
    Rita~
    Wed Mar 26, 2008 6:29 pm
    Forum Host
    John DOH wrote:
    Rita, Rita, you make a wonderful post, but consider that there are only 3 of us here to eat such a roast, and 18 lbs is a bit "much" under those circumstances!

    At best, we might get 6 eaters, and out at the cottage, as many as 8 or even 10!

    I guess I like mine a bit more "well done" but can seriously recommend "Daddy Hinkles" liquid marinade and rub; likwise, peeling the membrane from the rib bones to soak the extra flavours in.

    Herbs are a great improvement; using the "lardooning" technique (poking a hole into the meat with a boning knife, inserting a sliver of fresh garlic, onion, rosemary "pins" as opposed "stems") and such can really add to the results.

    You'll never get any big ton of recipe suggestions for this roast, just a bunch of incidental "tips" on what "works", as Prime or Standing Rib Roasts are hard to screw up.

    Mind, if I had my "druthers" I'd do it on a rotisserie, but I'm a Canuck, and maybe we do things "differently" from our southern neighbours...

    John

    "lardooning" sounds great.
    And different is always fun!
    Red Apple Guy
    Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:35 am
    Forum Host
    Last Christmas, a few of us here got all "primed" for smoked rib roast. Here's a shot from Bad Santa's efforts.

    Some personal preferences on this cut:

    1) I don't always spring for "prime" but I don't go cheap either. It's worth it to pick quality meat. If it's your main dish at a special dinner, spend a little more on this king of roasts. Hint, talk to your butcher before spending a bundle here and pick his brain.
    2) Pick your poison on heat. This roast can take some heat, so fire the pit or grill up, cook at 350 F if you can, monitor the internal temp. shooting for 135 F or so (it'll heat up a little while resting), and you'll get a roast that has end cuts for those who are afraid of pink meat, and center cuts for those who are not. Time will be 2 to 3 hours. OR...cook at the conventional smoker temps of 225F to 250F and every inch of the roast will be the same degree of doneness (6 to 8 hours later).
    3) If using a grill, cook indirectly (the meat is not over the flame or coals) and work to control the heat in the range you want.
    4) Use smoke wood regardless of the type of grill or pit you have and put some smoke on it during the early part of the cook. I like oak and apple, but use what you like. Hickory and Mesquite are strong, so go easy or cut with some oak.
    5) If you like to remove the bones before cooking, get your butcher to do so, but tie them back on with butcher's twine for the flavor bones add to the roast during the cook.
    6) Let it rest before slicing.
    7) This will shock you a little, but at Thanksgiving, I seasoned the roast with salt and pepper and dusted it with seasoned flour. The flour forms a crust during the cook that I like. You may not. My NY buddy across the street got me hooked on that for oven roasts, but it was good in the smoker too.
    Rita~
    Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:31 am
    Forum Host
    RED THANKS FOR ALL THE INFO!
    I sure can see the flour working!
    Mama's Kitchen (Hope)
    Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:58 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Oh WOW! What a great thread Rita!

    Thanks for sharing this with us!
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