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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / WF to WW = Troubles!
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    WF to WW = Troubles!

    AKillian24
    Mon Jan 31, 2005 12:28 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Alright -
    So this post does not come without a foundation of great experiementing/homework done from this end, however I wanted to ask the group in attempt to find consistent success in getting loaves to rise enough! (Wheat Gluten, Lemon Juice included)

    In making a WF recipe using WW flour, what things have you found that work? At the moment, it's a bit hit & miss on which ones have worked (#47111 ) - and ones that have come out flat and/or didn't rise enough after I substituted with WW (#81220). this was a great recipe - however didn't rise enough.

    So ... in contrast to the 'afraid of yeast' thread .... do I need more of it? icon_lol.gif
    Marg (CaymanDesigns)
    Mon Jan 31, 2005 5:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    How much wheat flour are you substituting for the white? I have found that I can only go about 1/2 and 1/2 in a recipe written for white flour. I do have some wheat recipes (Our Favorite Wheat Bread recipe #94990) that use a slightly higher ratio. I have never had the above recipe fail and I've used both bread flour and all-purpose in it.

    HTH,
    AKillian24
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 8:25 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I am working on / looking to find recipes that are 100% whole wheat (or rye, oat, etc). I would like to eliminate white flour wherever possible. That recipe looks great - have you (or anyone!) ever tried it with whole wheat flour w/o the 'assistance' of bread flour?

    Angela
    Donna M.
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 11:38 am
    Forum Host
    Are you baking your bread in the machine or in the oven? I would suggest that you use the dough cycle and then shape and bake your loaf in the oven. Wheat bread takes much longer to rise and if you are baking in the machine you are limited as to how much rise time you have.

    I would also use regular yeast (not instant or bread machine yeast) and I would definitely add wheat gluten. Use 1 1/2 tsp. of gluten per cup of flour with wholegrains. You could add a little more yeast. It won't hurt it.

    Don't pay any attention to stated rise times in recipes. If it takes 2 hours to get the desired volume, then let it take that long!

    The two recipes you were comparing, one uses water and the other milk. Recipes made with water will rise faster, as it is less dense than milk. It shouldn't make a significant difference--just longer rise time.

    Keep us posted as to how it is going and what ends up working for you.
    Donna M.
    Wed Feb 02, 2005 2:12 pm
    Forum Host
    Another possibility that I forgot to mention is that you aren't kneading your dough enough to develop the gluten thoroughly. Underdeveloped gluten will result in a poor rise. I am so used to letting my bread machine do that part that it didn't occur to me right away. When kneading by hand, you must do it for a good 10 or even 15 minutes. It can be a real workout if you aren't used to it.
    ThatBobbieGirl
    Thu Feb 03, 2005 11:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Here's "our daily bread" recipe -- we eat this every day and it's WHITE FLOUR FREE

    Honey Wheat Oatmeal Bread -- All Wholegrain Version

    Adding vital wheat gluten will enable the wholegrain bread to rise and stay risen rather than collapse.
    AKillian24
    Sun Feb 06, 2005 1:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Ok! I'm going to give the Oatmeal Bread a whirl - it looks great! I'll report back.....
    AKillian24
    Sun Feb 06, 2005 3:14 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    ThatBobbyGirl-
    What size loaf does this yield? Looks great....
    ThatBobbieGirl
    Sun Feb 06, 2005 3:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    AKillian24 wrote:
    ThatBobbyGirl-
    What size loaf does this yield? Looks great....


    It's about a 2 pound loaf

    Check your manual and see if you can make a recipe that takes 4 cups flour (which the 1 cup oats and 3 cups WW flour is approximately equivalent to)

    If it's smaller, you can adjust it proportionately to a smaller loaf that your machine can handle.

    (If you have trouble with that, I could do the calculations for you. Just let me know)
    AKillian24
    Sun Feb 06, 2005 3:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Nope! My ABM actually does hold a 2lb loaf - I can't wait! Making a run to the store for a few things - Thanks so much for the suggestion!!
    AKillian24
    Sun Feb 06, 2005 8:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    WOWOWOWIEE!!

    This is IT! I just posted a review - but I've been looking for a whole wheat recipe like this since I got a bread machine for Christmas. Thanks - this is perfect. I'm going to try another loaf with my low-carb bake mix and see how it goes... this is my new staple recipe. Thanks soooooo much!!! icon_biggrin.gif
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