Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / German and Benelux (Belgium / The Netherlands / Luxembourg) Cooking / Looking for dough for poppy seed kuchen
    Lost? Site Map

    Looking for dough for poppy seed kuchen

    Inge 1505
    Wed Jan 26, 2005 4:03 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I just posted the same request to the new Dessert Forum

    I am trying to create a poppy seed kuchen recipe and need a suggestion for the crust- no classical pie crust, please. ( I am German and poppy seed kuchen are rather popular here , but are never quite to my taste.)

    Usually there are two different kinds of kuchen but the filling is rather similar: ground poppy seeds cooked with sugar and milk, thickened with cornstarch, flavoured with lemon zest, chopped almonds, raisins and cinnamon. This filling is then either spread 3/4 inch thick on rolled out slightly sweetened yeast dough and topped with crumbles then baked - or put 3/4 inch thick in a lightly pre-baked pie crust and topped with a slightly thicker cream cheese filling then baked.
    There are things I always did not like about the classical filling (texture, sweetness, raisins!), so I was quite happy when I found – quite by chance, looking for something else – a different poppy seed kuchen in a hundered year old cookbook. I am really pleased with my variation of the filling icon_smile.gif, but not with the crust. icon_sad.gif

    THAT IS WHAT I AM LOOKING FOR: A dough similar in texture to yeast dough, using cream cheese and not too much baking powder. Is there such a thing or do I have to go for a real yeast dough? I want to have a ¼ - 3/8 inch thick crust topped with ¾ inch thick poppy seed filling, cut into 2 or 3 inch squares. Crust should enable to eat kuchen out of hand if so desired and not be very sweet, as filling already is. Am I asking for the impossible? icon_lol.gif
    Polar Bear
    Thu Jan 27, 2005 7:12 am
    Food.com Groupie
    You can try ordering several German cookbooks since you live in Germany and read German. This is mainly an American website. German recipes translated English will be very useful here ! Post them as soon as you can. Your being an authentic German could help others.
    HeatherFeather
    Thu Jan 27, 2005 9:07 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I will go through my cookbooks and see if I can find something for you. I seem to recall seeing something with cream cheese in the dough in either an old issue of Lisa or Meine Familie & Ich. I will have to dig through my recipe clippings as I recently tore up many of my older issues, just keeping the recipes I thought I would try. However, since I bake a lot I usually keep all of the baking recipes. If I have a version, I will share it.

    Glad to have you on board. icon_smile.gif
    Inge 1505
    Thu Jan 27, 2005 2:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you both for your nice replies, Polarbear I already have 200+ cookbooks, mostly in German because I am German. I tried a quark-oil-dough, but did not like the baking powder taste of it icon_sad.gif . I remembered having seen recipes using cream cheese and I think I have been successful at the Desert Forum.
    So Heather, it is really very nice that you would go through all your recipes, but I imagine, with just having moved you have a lot of other work at your hands. I am sure your vast collection will be helpful to me and all the others another time. icon_biggrin.gif

    And thanks, I am glad you are all on board, too. icon_biggrin.gif
    rangapeach
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 1:52 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Inge 1505 wrote:
    I just posted the same request to the new Dessert Forum

    I am trying to create a poppy seed kuchen recipe and need a suggestion for the crust- no classical pie crust, please. ( I am German and poppy seed kuchen are rather popular here , but are never quite to my taste.)

    Usually there are two different kinds of kuchen but the filling is rather similar: ground poppy seeds cooked with sugar and milk, thickened with cornstarch, flavoured with lemon zest, chopped almonds, raisins and cinnamon. This filling is then either spread 3/4 inch thick on rolled out slightly sweetened yeast dough and topped with crumbles then baked - or put 3/4 inch thick in a lightly pre-baked pie crust and topped with a slightly thicker cream cheese filling then baked.
    There are things I always did not like about the classical filling (texture, sweetness, raisins!), so I was quite happy when I found – quite by chance, looking for something else – a different poppy seed kuchen in a hundered year old cookbook. I am really pleased with my variation of the filling icon_smile.gif, but not with the crust. icon_sad.gif

    THAT IS WHAT I AM LOOKING FOR: A dough similar in texture to yeast dough, using cream cheese and not too much baking powder. Is there such a thing or do I have to go for a real yeast dough? I want to have a ¼ - 3/8 inch thick crust topped with ¾ inch thick poppy seed filling, cut into 2 or 3 inch squares. Crust should enable to eat kuchen out of hand if so desired and not be very sweet, as filling already is. Am I asking for the impossible? icon_lol.gif


    Inge, What follows is an unedited recipe for Beigli (Austro-Hungarian walnut/poppy seed cake). It is rolled up like strudel but not a strudel dough. This is what my Grandma used to make . There is also a recipe on the Martha Stewart site and I know she's published it in several of her cookbooks. Don't forget her mother is of Polish background.

    Walnut and Poppy Seed Milk Bread Diós és Mákos kalács (bejgli) Ingredients for batter:
    11 oz. butter,
    1 and half tablespoon of sugar,
    7 egg yolks,
    300 ml/11 oz. milk,
    pinch of salt, 1
    5 g/half oz. yeast,
    1000g/2 lb. flour
    Ingredients for walnut filling:
    1 and quarter of kg/2 and half lb. ground walnuts,
    1000 g/2 lb. sugar
    hot milk,
    60 g/2 and half oz. cooking chocolate,
    450 g/1 lb. stoned and chopped dates,
    3-4 peeled and grated apples,
    150 g/5 oz. sultanas,
    150 g/5 oz. chopped quince cheese
    4-5 tablespoon of appricot jam,
    half teaspoon of vanilla essence,
    3-4 egg whites
    Ingredients for poppy seed filling:
    225 g/8 oz. ground poppy seeds,
    225 g/8 oz. sugar or honey,
    1 teaspoon of grated lemon peel,
    half teaspoon of vanilla essence,
    150 g/5 oz. sultanas,
    4-5 tabespoon of apricot jam,
    2-3 egg whites
    >Preparation Dissolve the yeast in the milk. Cream together the butter, sugar and salt. Add the egg yolks one by one and the yeast dissolved in a little lukewarm water. Fold in the sieved flour. Blend thoroughly with a spoon or by hand. Then roll out and fold three times on a floured pastry board, resting the dough for 30 minutes after each rolling and folding process. Then roll out very thin into squares of 30-33 cm/12-13 inch and spread with one of the fillings below, leaving the edges (1-2 cm/half inch) free. Roll up in the same way as for strudel. Place on a baking tin, brush with egg and prick in a few places with a fork. Leave to rest for 15 minutes, then brush again with egg. Bake in a slow oven to start with, then turn it up until the bread is golden brown.
    For the walnut filling, dissolve the sugar and melt the chocolate in a little hot milk. Then add the ground chocolate in a little hot milk. Then add the ground walnuts and all the other ingredients, folding in the stiffly beaten egg whites at the end.
    To make the poppy seeds filling, make a syrup with sugar or honey and a little water. Then add the ground poppy seeds and cook for a few minutes. Remove from the heat and mix in the lemon peel, vanilla essence, sultanas, jam and finally the stiffly beaten egg whites.
    As I said, I haven't tidied up this recipe yet. But it seems very close to my Grandma's.
    I will post this properly at a later date.
    Oh boy icon_rolleyes.gif I just reread your post and realized this isn't the one you are looking for. Sorry icon_redface.gif
    Inge 1505
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 2:58 am
    Food.com Groupie
    rangapeach (Petra) wrote:

    Oh boy icon_rolleyes.gif I just reread your post and realized this isn't the one you are looking for. Sorry icon_redface.gif


    Perhaps not the one I was looking for, but I like the idea for the walnut filling and might try it some time. You should certainly post it, it sounds like a delicious dessert. Thanks for going to all the trouble icon_smile.gif

    BTW, you can probably make a LOT of breads out of it? icon_smile.gif
    Barbara in Holland
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 3:08 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Hi. This is a recipe that my Slavic mother-in-law made every Christmas and they were delicious. She always used the walnut filling, and rolled them into small crescents. A family tradition and the work involved to make them was worth it. Happy eating.
    rangapeach
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 6:41 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Inge 1505 wrote:
    rangapeach (Petra) wrote:

    Oh boy icon_rolleyes.gif I just reread your post and realized this isn't the one you are looking for. Sorry icon_redface.gif


    Perhaps not the one I was looking for, but I like the idea for the walnut filling and might try it some time. You should certainly post it, it sounds like a delicious dessert. Thanks for going to all the trouble icon_smile.gif

    BTW, you can probably make a LOT of breads out of it? icon_smile.gif

    Probably at least three, but that's when you expect a lot of company icon_wink.gif
    E-mail me when someone replies to this
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites